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COPYRIGHT, 1936 

JEAN WILLIAMS 
Editor-in-Chief 



JOSEPHINE jMORETZ 
Business Manager 





THE 1936 

HICKORY LOG 



Published by 

THE SENIOR CLASS 

of 

Hickory High School 






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FOREWORD 



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After having your pictures made. 
And after all your dues are paid. 
After the staff has done more than you can 

guess. 
To make this log what you call a success. 
After silling on pins and watting to see, 
How the '36 Hickory Log will be, 
The finished product is given to you. 
To prize and cherish the coming years thru. 



CONTENTS 

FACULTY 

CLASSES 

ACTIVITIES 

ATHLETICS 

SNAPSHOTS 

ADVERTISEMENTS 




Miss Rosa Lee Dixon 



DEDICATION 



To 
MISS ROSA LEE DIXON 

WE. THE SENIOR CLASS OF '36. DEDICATE THIS 20th EDITION 

OF THE •HICKORY LOG" IN APPRECIATION OF THE 

FRIENDSHIP AND HELP SHE HAS SHOWN US 

THROUGHOUT OUR HIGH SCHOOL CAREER. 



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FOR YEARS, MEDICAL ADVISOR TO THE FOOTBALL 

TEAMS, AND ALWAYS A LOYAL FRIEND 

TO HICKORY HI. 



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FACULTY 



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R. W. Carver 

Superintendent 

Maryvillc 



W. D. COTTRELL 
Principal 

V. P. I. 



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Mary Virginia Cox 

Lenoir Rhyne 

History 

Emma Fritz 

Lenoir Rhyne 

English 



Doris Pope 

Lenoir Rhyne 

English — Civics 

Rosa Lee Dixon 
W. C. U. N. C 

Mathematics 



E. G. CASHION 

Carolina 

Civics 

Helen Frye 

W. C U. N. C 

Home Economics 



Helen Miller 

Lenoir Rhyne 

English 

Elisabeth Councill 

Sweet Briar 

English 



Eudora Dover 

Winthrop 
Commercial 

Katherine Perry 

Lenoir Rhyne 

English 











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Mrs. James Winkler 

Carson-Newman 

History — Economics 

Lena Greever 

Lenoir Rhyne 

Mathematics 

Millie Kate McComb 

Flora MacDonald 

English 

K. V. Walling 

University of Indiana 

Physical Education 



Ethel Starnes 

Elon 

Mathematics 

B. E. Scarborough 

Wake Forest 

Science — Coaching 



Mrs. Francis Patterson 

W. C. U. N. C 

Spanish 

Edith Setzer 

Lenoir Rhyne 

Latin 



Hume Craft 

Lenoir Rhyne 

Science 

Adelaide Shuford 

W. C. U. N. C. 

Spanish — French 



S. E. Starnes 

Duke 

Science 



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(S) 







SENIORS 



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SENIOR 
MASCOTS 



Alice Reichard 



Aldis Henderson. Jr. 




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SENIOR GLASS 
OFFICERS 



James Garrett 
President 



Henry Reichard 
Vice-President 



Nina Hall 
Secretary-Treasurer 



It 



HICKORY LOG 
LOG STAFF 




Jean Williams 

'Editor-in-Chief 



Peggy Setzer 

Associate Editor 




Margaret Flowers 

Senior Editor 



ALVIN LOWDERMILK 
Assistant Senior Editor 



Harriet Cilley 

Assistant Senior Editor 




Mary Councill 

Club Editor 



Charles kanupp 

Athletic Editor 



Dorothy Buchanan 

Student Editor 



HICKORY LOG 



LOG STAFF 




Josephine Moretz 

Business Manager 



Henry Reichard 

Assistant Business Manager 



Melford Gaither 

Assistant Business Manager 




Erskine Garrison 

Circulation Manager 



Martha Moretz 

Snapshot Editor 



Mary Leonard 

Typist 



H. D. Moretz 

Assistant Typist 




Nina Hall 

Assistant Snapshot Editor 



Mrs. James Winkler 

Faculty Advisor 



X6 







RUSSELL ABEE 

Football '33, '34, '35; Basketball '34, '35, '36; Alternate Basketball 
Captain '35; Baseball '35, '36; Hi-Y '35, '36. 

To "Russ" we owe many a hard-fought-for point in both basketball 
and football. His determination will win him fame in later life. 



THELMA ANNAS 

Thelma is a pleasant and likable student, a girl who always has her 
work done ahead of time. Here's the best of luck to you in the future. 



AILEEN ABEE 

Here's a hard-working, dependable girl — one whom we shall remen 
her as a worthwhile part of the class of '36. 



JOHN R. ABEE. JR. 

Quiet in manner — dignified in appearance — yet a jolly good fellow 
to have around is our "Friend John." 



PHIFER BERRY 

Phifer is mischievous, talkative, and perhaps a wee bit indolent, but 
who can forget his ability to get by regardless of these characteristics. 



EDITH FRANCES BURNS 

Home Economics Club '35. 

This pleasant addition to our class became one of us in her junior 
year— long enough for us to learn to count on her to do the part assigned 
to her. 



IRIS ABERNETHY 

Did you know that Iris is inclined toward commercial art? Like 
the flower whose name she bears she spreads cheer wherever she appears. 



MAX HAMMOND 

Art Club '35, '36; Football '33, '34; Hi-Y Club '^.^, '34; Demosthen- 
ean Literary Society '35 ; Anonymous Club '36. 

A pencil in his hand just won't be still! Thoroughly devoted to his 
aim of becoming a great commercial artist is Max! Best o' luck! 



RICHARD HEFNER 

Richard doesn't talk very much, but when he does have something 
to say it is really worth hearing. 



EVELYN MARITA AUSTIN 

Frye Talented Club '3(3. 
Evelyn is small but she holds a large place in our class. 



WILLIE RUTH BEACH 

Ruth is small but this doesn't affect her qualities as a good student 
and a very likable girl. 



ERNEST BROWN 

Baseball ■}!, '35, '36. 
"Brownie's" skill as a bicyclist is remarkable. He has many friends. 



£1 



MAX PRESLAR 

Baseball '35; Boxing '32, 



'33. 



This handsome blond with wavy hair is one of the heart-breakers of 
the high school. What would the girls do without him? 

ELLEN LOUISE McFALL 

French '35, '36. 
Very decided in her views but usually thinks straight. Count on Ellen 
to do her best always. 



ADDIE ELIZABETH LOCKE 

Glee Club '34, '35; Treasurer Home Economics Club '36; Reporter 
High School Masqueradors, '36; Treasurer Frye Talented Club '36. 

Quiet, unassuming is Addie. nevertheless she always wins you by that 
cheerful, friendly smile. 



JACK CORDELL 
Football '34, '35; Baseball '35 



'36. 



Is Jack reserved, or conceited? Those who do not know him say 
that he's reserved, but he appears quite friendly to those who know 
him better. 



THOMAS RICHARD WILLIAMS. JR. 

Glee Club '34. '35; Football '35, '36. 

Has there been a contest this year ? Well, Richard has done well 
and we think he's winning. A fine friendly boy whom we shall remember. 

RACHEL ELIZABETH MANESS 

Glee Club '34, '35; French Club '35, '36. 

Her sweet voice and winning smile will surely attract you and hold 
you long among her circle of friends. 



EVE TOMLINSON 

Glee Club '33, '35. '36; Vice-President Glee Club '35; President Glee 
Club '36 ; Home Economics Club '36 ; French Club '36 ; Secretary and 
Treasurer Dramatic Club '35. 

Eve, with her personality and peppy music has added charm to our 
class. 



ZACK GUTHRIE 

Zack and Miller should go a long way together — but if they are ever 
separated, no one knows what will happen to them. 



HENDLEY ELLINGTON 

Glee Club '36; Student Safety Patrol '36. 

Hendley has quiet, business-like manners and a great capacity for 
work. Perhaps that's the reason he's such a dependable student. 

MARTHA JANE MORETZ 

Glee Club '33; French Club '35, '36; Vice-President French Club '35; 
President French Club '36; Junior Marshal '35; Log Staff '36; Presi- 
dent Speakeasy Literary Society '35; Anonymous Club '36. 

Ability to make wise cracks and ability to draw combined to make 
Martha one of our most outstanding Seniors. 



RANALDA COULTER 

Speakeasy Literary Society '35; French Club '36; Home Economics 
Club '36; Frye Talented Club '36. 

Ranalda's friends find her to be a very friendly and agreeable com- 
panion. She has an abundant supply of general knowledge. 

AARON BEACH 

Aaron is very quiet in class, but he is an amiable boy, and quite 
jolly outside of school. 



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O. K. DEITZ 

Some day O. K. will make a good professor but at present he is 
finishing a brilliant career at Hickory High School. 



HELEN CATER 

Helen has worked hard during her high school days, abiding by the 
rule: "Speak only when spoken to." 



MARGARET COOK 

Speakeasy Literary Society '34, '35. 

A quiet girl with a bright smile is Margaret. She is a good com- 
panion and a firm friend. 

GORDON ELROD 

Although "G. E.," the speed demon, isn't in school very much, every- 
one likes him. He is always ready to give you a "lift" if you care to 
ride with him. 



HARRY FRANCIS STEELMAN 

Junior Marshal '35; French Club '35. '36; Wigs and Masque Club '36. 
Harry has been living up to the standard made by the other Steel- 
mans in their ability to succeed. 



Demosthenean Literary 



BETTY WARLICK 

French Club '35, '36 ; Junior Marshal '35 
Society '35; Anonymous Club '36. 

Betty has a real gift for music and we're sure that she is going 
places with this wonderful ability. 



EUGENIA IVEY 

Band '35, '36; Orchestra '35; Librarian of Band '36. 
Besides being a good student, Eugenia is a skilled cornetist and 
pianist. 

H. D. MORETZ 

Glee CI ult '35, '36 ; Secretary and Treasurer Masqueraders Dramatic 
Club '35, '36; Log Staft '36 Band '35; Orchestra '34, '35. 

H. D. likes brunettes, especially one He will always be remem- 
bered at High School for his leading roles in dramatics. 



JUDSON PARLIER 

Football '32, 'ii '3-4; Spanish Club '34; Six Harmonizer '36. 
From the top of his head to the tip of his toes, Judson is all mirth. 

JOAN WHITENER 

Glee Club '35. '36; Band '35, '36; Orchestra '34. *35; Basketball '35, 
'36; Reporter Home Economics Club '36 ; French Club '35 ; Junior 
Marshal '35 ; Secretary Glee Club '36; Monogram Club '36. 

If you hear a loud laugh, look for "Jo Anne." She's smart in school 
and a crack-shot basketball player. She's also an important member 
of the band. 

NINA HALL 

Secretary and Treasurer Glee Club '33, '34; French Club '35, '36; 
Basketball '33, '34, *35, '36; Secretary and Treasurer Senior Class '36; 
Student Council '36 ; Log Staff '36; Cheerleader '36; Six Harmonizer 
'36; Secretary and Treasurer Monogram Club '36. 

"Sis" is sure to go far in this world if she keeps up the work that 
she started at Hickory High. She has that school spirit! 

ELMER H. TROUTMAN 

Glee Club '35. '3C\; Student Safety Patrol '36; Junior Marshal '35; 
Orchestra '33. 

Although Elmer is very quiet, everyone likes him. If any question 
is bothering you, just ask Elmer, for he is very smart. 



.23 



TURNER JAMES 

Football '33; Reporter Westmont Review '34. 

Quiet, intelligent, Turner is a great fellow when you know him. Shy? 
Yes, but he knows what to say and when to say it. 

KATHERINE HELTON 

Speakeasy Literary Society '34, '35. 

Katherine is one of the steadiest and most dependable girls in our 
class. 

VIRGINIA RUTH YOUNT 

Glee Club '36. 

Ruth gets credit for being one of the friendliest girls in our school. 
She is one of our few good singers. 

FRANK DEITZ 

Football '31, '32, '33, '34, '35; Basketball '35, '36; Manager Basket- 
ball '35; Baseball '32, '35, '36; Hi-Y Club '34, '35, '36; Monogram 
Club '36. 

Frank is truly an athletic-minded boy. To him goes many a thanks 
for his part in an interesting game. 



FRANK HAMMOND 

Football '34; Masqueradors '36; Stutterer's Literary Society '35. 

Our special delivery man, sometimes called "Flab," is noted for show- 
ing people a good time, especially one curly -headed Senior girl. 

ANITA MacGREGOR BINGHAM 

Wigs and Masque Club '35, '36; Masqueraders, '35, '36; French Club 
'36; Stutterer's Literary Society '35. 

With her dramatic ability Anita should go places in the world. She 
is outstanding in many things — especially in her ability to capture a 
certain boy's heart. 



MILDRED HALE 

Mildred's chief interests outside of school are boys and dancing. Her 
chief interest in school is the 3 :30 bell. 



JOE WEBB 

Masqueradors Club '36. 

Joe, although quiet, is well liked by all who know him. He makes 
a swell crook in a play. 



CHARLES E. KANUPP 

Football '32, '33, '34, '35; Basketball '33. '34, '35. '36; Baseball '33, 
'35, '36; Dramatic Club '35, '36; Monogram Club '36. 

"Doc," the terror of the gridiron, has really made a name for him- 
self in Hickory High School — especially with the girls. 



MARY LAURA HUFFMAN 

Glee Club '35; Home Economics Club '36; Frye Talented Club '36. 

Mary Laura, if we all had your recipe for being quiet, the teachers 
would have no trouble. 



JULIA EMILYN HERMAN 

Julia excels in her studies, and it is believed that she also gives the 
boys a thought every now and then. 



ERSKINE BROWN GARRISON, JR. 

Log Staff '36. 

In geometry the dingle and the dangle of the corresponding angle 
does not worry Erskine much, but he must get his papers out on time. 



-?7 






4 *5* 













A^i 




HOWARD DEWEY WHITE 

Although he is a hit plump, Howard is very friendly with everyone, 
and he always wears the old personality smile. 

FOSTEENA VARNER 

Glee Club '34, '35, '36; High School Masqueradors, '36 Wigs and 
Masque Dramatic Club '35, '36. 

Fosteena seems to take things as they come without worrying much. 
She will be remembered for her dramatic ability. 



JUANITA KEAN 

Juanita, with her long list of boy friends, never loses any sleep over 
her studies; but with her friendliness she will get along. 

JOHN WALKER 

Basketball '36; Freshman Class President '33; Junior Class Secretary 
and Treasurer '35; Student Council '35; High School Masqueradors, 
*36; Glee Club '36. 

"Born in 1919 and still going strong." Johnny is one of our Seniors 
who is sincere and dependable. He has lots of friends and we wish 
him a great deal of luck. 



EUGENE SIGMON, JR. 

Football '33, '34. '35; Baseball '35, '36. 

If "Gene" has anything to say, you will have to pardon his Southern 
accent; nevertheless he is very intelligent, and never gives the teacher 
any trouble. 

JEAN WILLIAMS 

Glee Club '33; President Sophomore Class '34; Basketball '34, '35, 
'36; Captain Basketball '36; Cheerleader '34, '35, '36; Editor Lor, Staff 
'36; Six Harmonizer '36; President Monogram Club '36. 

A dependable student, a valuable athlete, a splendid leader — such a girl 
as Jean schools couldn't do without. 



MARY LEONARD 

Glee Club '33; Basketball '35. '36; Alternate Captain Basketball '36; 
Log Staff '36; Six Harmonizer '36; Vice-President Monogram Club '36. 

Mary has always been willing to help when she is needed. She does 
all her work cheerfully and competently. 

HENRY REICHARD 

Secretary Hi-Y Club '34; President Hi-Y Club '35 ; Student Council 
'35, '36; Vice-President Student Council '36; Vice-President Junior Class 
'35; Vice-President Senior Class '36; Tennis '34, '35; Log Staff '36; Six 
Harmonizer '36. 

Henry is another quiet but popular boy whom we expect to go a long 
way. Here's luck to you, Henry, 



MARCUS GENTRY SETZER. JR. 

M. G. never* sees a dull moment. He should make a track star, judg- 
ing from the get-away he makes at lunch time. 

DOROTHY BUCHANAN 



Glee Club '35 
nomics Club '36 



Home Economics Club '36; Vice-President Home Eco- 
Anonymous Club '36; Log Staff '36. 

Talkative, gay and companionable — Dot will never be lacking in some- 
thing to do. 



NELLIE KATE INGOLD 

Glee Club '34, '35, '36. 
Nellie Kate is conscientious in her work and sincere in her friend- 



ships. 



CARL MILLER 



Quiet, pleasing in appearance, and a cheerful, willing student is Carl. 
May Good Luck go with you! 



■as- 



NILES COMPTON 

Art Club '35, '36; President Spanish Club '34; Editor-in-Chief West- 
mont Review '34. 

"It's the little things in life that count," says Xiles, "and I'm little." 
Although Xiles can be an awful pest, we must say that he's a very 
good artist. 

DOROTHY V. HAWN 

Dorothy is rather quiet in class but she has a good personality. We 
know she'll succeed. 



ERNESTINE KINGSOLVER 

Tall and jolly is Ernestine. Without her our class would not be 
complete. She 11 always be where the fun is. 



BOYCE FORBES 

School life for him has been a dream— and we can't decide whether 
a "Midsummer Night's Dream" or a mere nightmare. 



HENRY WILLIAMS 

Hi-Y Club '34, '35, '36; Tennis '36; Glee Club "36; Stage Manager '36. 

"Happy am I, from care I'm free; why aren't they all contented like 
me?" seems to be Henry's slogan. 



MARY LEGH GEITNER 

President Home Economics Club '36; Anonymous Club '36. 

If you see a crowd of boys, look in the middle and you'll find Mary 
Legh. Although she goes with others, she prefers boys with uniforms. 



ANNIE MAE BUFF 

Although very quiet, Annie Mae has made many friends. Whatever 
she does we know will be done well. 

DAVID GOSNOLD 

Football '32, '33, "34, '35; Basketball '33, '34, '35. '36; Tennis '34, 
'35, '36; Manager Tennis '35; Captain Tennis '36; Hi-Y Club '34, '35, 
*36; Vice-President Hi-Y Club '36; Glee Club '36; Assistant Stage 
Manager '35 ; Stage Manager '36; Boxing '33. 

Good-natured, likable, easy-going David has a great following of 
friends. 



LAWRENCE JEFFERSON YOUNT 

What he tackles, he tackles with a vim. We couldn't do without 
students like him. 



RUBY DEAL 

Ruby is a good student who seldom makes a mistake; but when she 
does, her face turns as red as her hair. 



NINA WILMA DAVIDSON 

Frye Talented Club '36. 

Her accomplishments in the Home Economics Department makes us 
applaud Wilma for her domestic talent. 

RUSSELL HYDER 

Russell keeps all the girls supplied with chewing gum; therefore he is 
very popular with the belles of Hickory High. 















OSCAR ALFRED BISHOP 

Typing expert, lall and handsome, always around if there is a girl 
involved — that's Oscar. 



DOROTHY BOSTAIN 

Dorothy's friendly disposition should be a great help m making he 
a good stenographer. 



WINIFRED BRYAN 

Glee Club '33; French Club '35, '36; Wigs and Masque Club '33, '34. 
'35, '36; Band '35; Orchestra '35; Secretary Speakeasy Society '35; 
Anonymous Club '36. 

"Winnie" is one of the friendliest girls in high school. We shall 
remember her as the girl who displayed so much dramatic ability. 

JAMES GARRETT 

President Senior Class '36; President Monogram Club '36; President 
Anonymous Club '36; Football '34, '35; Baseball '35, '36. 

James has enough Senior dignity to make up for the rest of us, and 
he has received many honors without seeking them. His records in 
athletics, classes, and as Senior President are all outstanding. 



EUBERT BOWMAN 

Eubert is very polite and a good student. Here's wishing him the 
best of good fortune. 



JENNIE SUE BLACK 

Jennie Sue is so sweet and friendly that we all like he 



BETTY BOWLES 

Art Club '35, '36; President Art Club '35; French Club '36; Anony- 
mous Club '36. 

Betty is a fine artist and very capable girl. She is the steady, reliable 
girl a teacher can depend on. 



CHARLES LEE BOWMAN 

High School Masqueradors '36; Basketball '36. 

Charles in his gallou-a-start Packard, always finds room for just one 
more. He has done much to enrich our plays. 



KENNETH KEEVER 

Football '34. 

Here's a fine friendly fellow who has many friends in the class, 
all of whom wish him the best o' luck. 



NANCY ALICE CLINE 

Glee Club '34; Home Economics Club '36. 

Nancy with her jokes and her jazz added to our high school just 
vhat it needed. 



HARRIET E. A. CILLEY 

Secretary and Treasurer Freshman Class '32. 

Harriet's wit and capability have certainly made her outstanding. To 
those who know her, she is a sincere friend. 

ALBERT BOLICK 

Albert has very little to say and he never gives the teachers any 

trouble. He is a good fellow, liked by all bis classmates. 



J27 



RALPH SELF 

Ralph is a good student and if he goes through life in the manner 
that he has gone through school, he is sure of success in everything 
that he attempts. 

CLARA HEFNER 

Spanish Club '35. 

Clara has that certain something about her that guarantees success 
and happiness in everything she undertakes. 



EDITH WINKLER 

Secretary and Treasurer of Craft's J. and S. Club '36; High School 
Masqueradors '36; President Rhetoric Literary Society '35. 

Here's to a girl with a fine disposition. We hope that the future will 

fulfill her ambitions. 



HERBERT SEABOCK 

Here's a boy whom we didn't become acquainted with readily, but we 
know nothing but good of h:m. 



ALBERT RUSSEL SMITH 

Manager Football Team '35. 

Judging from his Economics grades, Russel should make a big busi- 
ness man some day. At present he is one of Hickory High's best all- 
round students. 



JIMMIE CATHERINE LOHR 

If "gentlemen prefer blondes" Jimmie will surely be preferred. A 
most attractive and lovable girl . 



FRANCIS WHITENER 

President High School Masqueradors '35, '36; V ice- President Demos- 
thenean Literary Society "35; Anonymous Club '36. 

Dark and slender, with great dramatic ability — who knows but what 
we will see her on the screen one day? 



MILLER SIGMON 

Basketball '36. 

Miller stands above his classmates in size; therefore he should star 
in basketball — as he stars in his studies. 



RALPH M. PITTS 

Chemistry Club '36. 

Ralph hastened to leave our ranks for those of the matrimonial band. 
May gooil luck attend him! 

CHARLOTTE JONES 

Perry Literary Society '35; Home Economics Club '36; Frye Talented 
Club '36. 

Her smiling face and pleasant manner make her a delight to all who 
know her. 



MAUDE KAYLOR 

Spanish Club '34, '35; Frye Talented Club '35. '36. 

Maude, you do have perserverance. that good old "stick-to-it-iveness" 
that will carry you far. Best wishes. 



JACK ROLLINS 

Smail in stature — large in ambition. He is not going to be a "Jack" 
of all trades. Watch him specialize. 



n 






JOHNSON HUFFMAN 

Johnson is very quiet and never says much, but he will he remem- 
bered for the seriousness and personality he possesses. 



MARY LOUISE FREEMAN 

Outside of her studies Louise is interested in hoys. This should help 
in making her career a very interesting one. 



MARY ANN NAIL 

(Ilee Club '33; French Club '35, '36;. Wigs and Masque Club '36*, 
Treasurer Speakeasy Literary Society '.'5 ; Anonymous Club '36. 

Sober, quiet, and demure; a friend of whom you are always sure 
is Mary Ann. 



JAMES DELMAR HONEYCUTT ■ 

James is very quiet, reserved, and handsome, and at the present is 
an assistant in his father's shoe shop, but we expect bigger things from 
him in the future. 



CHARLES J. HENRY 
Football '32, '33; Assistant Manager of Football '31. 
Charles lets the burden of schoolwork rest lightly upon bis shoulders. 

JOSEPHINE MORETZ 

Wigs and Masque Club '35, '36; President Wigs and Masque Club 
'36; Art Club '35, '36; President Junior Class '35; Business Manager 
Loo '36; Student Council '35 ; Demosthenean Literary Society '35; 
Anonymous Club '36. 

Pretty, attractive, dependable, and capable is a wonderful combina- 
tion for a high school girl, and Josephine is certainly all of these. 

ELLEN HUFFMAN 

Craft's J. and S. Club '36 

Ellen is a fine girl— although very quiet, she is a girl well worth 
knowing. 

JAMES MELFORD GAITHER 

Secretary and Treasurer Sophomore Class '33 ; Hi-Y Club '35 ; Cheer 
Leader '36 ; Assistant Business Manager Log Staff '36; Wigs and 
Masque Club '36. 

If those Chevrolets are as good as Melford thinks they are, he should 
go places. Nevertheless, we advise him to get a Ford. 



RICHARD HICKS 

Richard is one of our best bus drivers. He seems to know how to 
play a guitar and sing well, too. 



AGNES ICARD 

Basketball '35, '36. 

"Ikcy" is one of our best basketball players, and she also has inter- 
est in the football team. She has lots of personality and many friends. 



GLADYS RUTH WHITENER 

Basketball '35, '36. 

Gladys is quiet and reserved. We don't see how they'll do without 
her next year in basketball; she is one of the highest (and tallest) rank- 
ing players. 

CLYDE WILSON JONES 

Football '34, '35; Baseball '33, '35, '36; Basketball '33, '34, '35, '36; 
Dramatic Club '35, '36. 

"Wimpy" is well known for his songs with guitar accompaniments. 



n 



HERBERT D. ROBINSON 

Herbert is so small that he isn't noticed very much, but he is a 
good boy to have as a friend. 



MARY LAIL 

If anyone should need a secretary, he should call on Mary, for she 
is an expert typist with lots of personality. 



MYRTLE RUTH MILLER 

Ruth is a good-looking, hard-working girl who is willing to do any- 
thing you ask her to do. 



BRADY SUTTLEMYRE 

Brady tries hard to appear glum at times, but that old smile will 
just break through. 



WILLIS SIMPSON 

Willis is always cheerful and amusing. He has many friends, for 
he takes time to tell you the kind thoughts he may have of you. 



NIHLA GAYNELL LAIL 

Glee Club '35; Basketball '34, '35, '36. 

With her good work in basketball and in school, Nihla has proved 
that she will be a great success in the future. 



SNOW HELEN SWATZEL 

Frye Talented Club '36; Home Economics Club '36; Perry Literary 
Society 35. 

This attractive little brunette has won a place in the hearts of all 
her school friends. 



ALVIN LOWDERMILK 

Log Staff '36. 

A keen wit, pleasant personality, and a fine sense of responsibility 
characterize Alvin. 



RICHARD FULBRIGHT 

Whatever is worth doing, is worth doing well." Richard really strives 
to put this rule into effect. He's a member of the class whom we may 
take seriously. 



DOROTHY ROSE THRONEBURG 

A pleasant girl who has not let school duties crowd out all pleasur 
she believes in having her fun. 



MARTHA REBEKAH THORNBROUGH 

Basketball Manager '35, '36; Publicity Reporter Home Economics '35; 
Secretary Home Economics Club '36; Perry Literary Society '35. 

High School would not be the same without girls of this type. She 
typifies some of the finest qualities of the American girl. 

J. D. YOUNT 

Here's to a very, very fine member of the Class of '36. May he 
reap much of life's good gifts. 



3d 





fM 



a* 












ELIZABETH FRANCES BOWMAN 

Elizabeth is always the same and she is liked by all of us. She is as 

good-natured as can be. 

JACK BECK 

Football '32, '3.!.. '34, '35; Captain '35; Basketball '33, '34, '35, '36; 
Baseball '32, '33: Captain '35. 

"Zip" has been Cod's gift to Hickory High's athletics. If he keeps 
up to the pace he is now going, he will lie an Ail-American in 1938. 



A. C. BOVENDER 

Ili-V Club '34, '35, '30; President Hi-V '36; Tennis '34. 

A. C. Bovender never seen without his chewing gum. We wonder what 
whould happen to him if they stopped making it. 

MARY PEELER CRAVEN 

Glee Club '33. 

Mary Peeler is a serious student and a dependable worker. She may 
always be found reading a good book. 



MARGARET FLOWERS 

French Club '35. '36; Secretary and Treasurer French Club '36; Vice- 
President Art Club '35 ; President Demosthenean Literary Society '35; 
Anonymous Club '36; Junior Marshal '35; Log Staff '36. 

Margaret is a living example of the sayings: "Small but valuable," 
"Attractive and capable/' "A good all-round High School girl," 

ARMON DEAL 

Basketball '35, '36; French Club '36; Student Patrol '36; Tunior 
Marshal '35; Baseball '36. 

Armon's a hard worker. We know he'll make good in his life work — 
whatever it may be. 



SAM COLERIDER 

Although Sam is a new-comer to our school, he seems to be quite 
well-known — especially among the female sex. 



PEGGY SETZER 

President Debating Team '36\ Log Staff '3b; Junior Marshal '35 ; 
Anonymous Club '36; French Club '35, '36. 

We'll always remember Peggy for her splendid disposition and never- 
failing pei>. We wish her lots of success in the future. 



MARY COUNCILL 

French Club '35, '36; Log Staff '36; Junior Marshal '35; Anonymous 
Club '36; Stutterers Literary Society '35. 

When you are looking for someone who knows, look for Mary. She 

is indeed a very capable student. 



AUBURN POOVEY 

Football '33: Tennis '34. '35, '36; Band '34, '35; Orchestra '34, '35. 

Auburn has become quite famous as a trumpet player. His reputation 
as a dancer isn't so bad either. 



ALONZO GILBERT BAILEY 

He's little and he's a terror for his size. Ask anyone if Alonzo ever 
comes to school on time. It would certainly be a surprise if he did. 



MILDRED CANIPE 

Home Economics Club '3$. 
'Sunshine" is the right nickname for this cheerful, helpful friend. 



GLEN ABEE 

Football '34. '35; Basketball '34. '35. 

This tall athlete will surely be missed at Hickory High — a veritable 
athletic treasure. 

VIVIAN SHIRLEY RINK 

Masqueraders Dramatic Club '36. 

Maybe her small stature is due to the fact that she has only had four 
birthday s — a leap-year girl. 

EDITH KAYLOR POPE 

Anonymous Club '36. 

With her cheerful smile and ready wit Edith has made herself an in- 
separable friend to both teachers and pupils in Hickory High. 

CHARLES NORMAN WHITENER 

Hi-Y Club '36. 

A good fellow — but he will talk in study hall. It must be fine to 
find amusement in everything. 



PAUL J. WILSON 

Baseball '32, '3i. '34. 
Quiet and easy-going, but decided in his views. 

OPAL JANET MITCHELL 
School is not altogether pleasure for her — but to a great extent it is. 



MARGARET HELEN MARLOWE 

Margaret does hate to stay in after school. We wonder why. There 
must be a reason. Guess. 



MAUDE MARIE MILLER 

It's often hard to learn the true worth of a quiet unassuming student, 
but we know Maude's pure gold. 



CHARLOTTE E. MOUSER 

Charlotte is another quiet, hard-working girl who will be missed 
next year. 



ELIZABETH WILSON 

Masqueraders Dramatic Club '36. 

A quiet girl who has a smile for everyone. Her disposition is a great 
asset, and her ability to carry six subjects means something. 



MILDRED JANET MILLER 

Mildred smiles and works right along, putting forth her best efforts 
all the time. 



RACHEL RUTLEDGE 

Rachel is a friend who is always light-hearted and cheerful, charming: 
in manner, and altogether a delightful girl. 



3Z 





MARY BELLE TATE 

Mary Belle is one who really deserves a diploma for she has worked 
hard four years for one. 



AILEEN YOUNT 

Home Economics Club '36. 

"Reliability" is her motto. Her determined effort to do what is re- 
quired of her will bring her success, we know, 

MARJORIE HELEN YOUNT 

Frye Talented Club '36; High School Masqueraders '36; Perry Liter- 
ary Society '35. 

Dramatic ability discovered this year! She'll be remembered by many 
as the ambitious mama in "Hold Everything." 



MARY VIOLA SIGMON 

Masqueraders Dramatic Club '36. 

Mary is the student's friend too — all like her, and feel free to ask 
her to help at any time. True friendliness. 



MARY COLE NORRIS 

Frye Talented Club '36; Home Economics Club '36; Speakeasy Liter- 
ary Society '35. 

True friendliness is a great quality, and here we see that quality 
personified. 

DINAH ENNIS 

Band '35; Orchestra '35; Frye Talented Club '36; Perry Literary 
Society '35. 

Is there anyone finer in English than Dinah? Dinah also excel Is 
in the art of making friends around Hickory High. 



MILDRED ELLEN MILLER 

Home Economics Club '34, '35; Worthwhile Club '36; Speakeasy Lit- 
erary Society '35. 

Mildred's effort to be here all the time and on time are commendable. 
Eleven years in school without an absence or a tardy. 



33 



HICKORY LOG 



SENIOR GLASS HISTORY 

In the course of human events it becomes necessary for us to write for the 
edification of posterity the happenings during our high school days. 

Having risen from the lowest form of existence — that of freshmen — to the 
highest pinnacle of dignity — that of seniors — we feel justly proud of ourselves 
and think the effort exerted to attain this peak has been well worth the giving. 

When we entered Hickory High School as freshmen we encountered the 
usual hazards, Algebra. Latin, Spanish and Sophomores. After hurdling all 
these difficulties successfully we became sophisticated sophomores. Embarking 
on this second year we thought that we owned the institution and that the 
newcomers were lower than the dust under our feet. Only too late did we 
realize that our time spent in "heckling" the underclassmen had cost us some 
of our members, via the failure route. Thus we passed the half-way mark 
with our shields untarnished and our heads unbowed. 

In our Junior year we discovered that, if the money with which to pay for 
our annual banquet were to be secured, we had to "cut the comedy." Faced 
with this almost insurmountable task we lent our energies to the work and 
finally acquired the sum for the event. This Junior-Senior reception, the major 
social function of the school year, was staged in an elaborate fashion and in a 
way befitting the Class of '36. 

No history would be complete without characters. For this reason we 
should like to recognize some of the outstanding personages connected with 
our success. The first is Miss Margaret Abernethy. who worked with unstint- 
ing effort to make the banquet distinctive; the other is Mrs. James Winkler, 
whose untiring labors with the publication of the LOG for the Class of 1936. 
We are indebted also to the faculty which has worked patiently and faith- 
fully with us during our sojourn here. 

In lieu of our departure let's give a toast to the past, for what it has meant 
to us; let's give another to the future, for what it holds in store for us! 

Harry Steelman. 



Page— Thirty-live 



• • 



J4 



HICKORY LOG 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

We, the Senior Class of the year nineteen hundred and thirty-six of Hickory High School of the State 
of North Carolina, after enjoying four years of school work and activities, and having attained our goal. 
will to the students who will follow in our ways the following: 

ARTICLE I 
To the Juniors, we do will and bequeath our titles and privileges. May they use them in honorable 
and useful ways. 

ARTICLE II 

Upon the Superintendent, principal, and faculty we bestow our love and gratitude. 

ARTICLE III— Individuals 
Betty Warlick wills her ability as a pianist to anyone talented along this line. 
To Frances Kennedy, Mary Cole Norris leaves her quiet and friendly disposition. 
To Ruth Sullivan, Rachel Rutledge leaves her desire to get to school on time. 
M. G. Setzcr leaves his girlish manner to Julius Abemethy. 

H. D. Moretz, will my attraction to brunettes to R. F. Poovey. 

Dorothy Thorneburg, confer my domestic talent to Sarah Fowler, hoping she will use it. 
Mildred Hale, leave my ability to attend all dances to Libby Jane Lynn. 
Helen Cater, bestow my bashfulness upon Harold Sherill. 
Martha Thorneburg, donate my affection for Maiden to Helen Deitz. 
Ernestine Kingsolver, leave my tall stature to Aileen Gaither. 
Howard White, leave my abundant curves to Bill George. 
Albert Bolick leaves his love for the fairer sex to Phillip Suttlemyre. 
Elizabeth Wilson, leave Hazel S tames my sincerity. 
Merle Houck, leave my bashfulness to Ronda Buchanan. 
Ellen Huffman, leave my quiet but pleasing manner to Telis Miller. 
Mary Lail leaves her knack in making good grades to Vernon Lackey. 
Kenneth Keever, donate my quietness and contentment to Hazel White. 
C. C. Mull, bestow my laziness upon Dorothy Creech. 
Katherine Helton leaves her ability to have lots of friends to Sarah Jane White. 
ack Rollins wants Helen Townsend to have part of his freckles. 
, Henry Williams, leave all my failures to Tom Pruitt. 

, Ophelia Hahn, leave my popularity (especially with out-of-town boys) to Clara Murphy. 
tuth Beach leaves her much admired eyes to Virginia Rhodes. 
Brady Suttlemyre leaves his curly locks to Max Green. 

Edith Pope will give Lois Mise her secret diet for reducing which she has used so frequently. 
Oscar Bishop, will my charming way with the ladies to Tom Clay. 
Wesley Sherrill, will my knowledge of history to B ill ie Carpenter. 
Eugene Sigmon, leave my admiration for the Democratic Party to S. A. Black. 
Charles Kanupp, bestow my athletic ability upon Bain Teague with the best wishes for success. 
Aileen Abee, will my soft voice to Clara Watkins. 
Lawrence Yount, leave my individuality to Marshall Mauney. 
Mary Sigmon leaves her singing talent to Virginia Rodes. 
Mary Belle Tate, leave my large eyes to Nancy Clay. 

Iris Abernethy, will my golden voice and sweet smile to Nell Pritchard. 
Wilma Davidson, will my graceful figure to Helen Parlier. 

Boyce Forbes, leave my innocent and intelligent expression to E. J. McCoy. 
Ronalda Coulter, leave my happy -goducky ways to joy Abernethy. 
Aileen Yount, leave my pretty hair and pleasing personality to Edna Austin. 
Nihla Lail, want Helen Rockett to fill my place on the basketball squad. 
_ osephhie Moretz leaves her rides every day at lunch with a certain town boy to Sarah Hester. 
"Mildred Miller leaves her fondness for driving to Billie Gilbert. 
Maude Miller leaves her love for checking main drag to Edna Stepp. 
, Addie Locke, will my talkative nature to Ruth Martin. 
, Margaret Cooke, leave my sweet temper to Peggy Garth. 

, Dorothy Bostain, leave my fondness of speaking only when spoken to to Connelly Gamble, Jr. 
saac Prevette wills his lazy manner to anyone that will accept it. 
, Evelyn Austin, want Helen Anderson to be as fond of history as T am. 
Mary Laura Huffman will glady give her history books to anyone who can use them. 
Zack Guthrie bestows upon Robert Lail his honor roll grades. 
, Russell Smith, leave my devotion for Economics to Evelyn Troutman. 

, James Garrett, will my undying love for a certain dark-haired girl to Robert Carpenter. 
, Clara Hefner, leave to Dorcus Gilbert my love and talent for dancing. 

, Aaron Beach, will my ability to eat in study hall without being caught to Everette Gilbert, 
oe Webb wills his sewing basket and his pleasing voice to Ruth Boatright (knowing she can use them). 
, Jack Cordell, do hereby will and bequeath my athletic ability to Alvin Phillips. 
I, Herbert Seaboch, leave my "giggles" to I la Fulk. 
Eubert Bowman leaves his reserved ways to Lloma Nell Mullins. 
Turner James leaves his delightful smile to Kathleen Whitener. 
Willis Simpson wants Joe Laridis to have his timid manner. 

I, Martha Moretz, will my wit and my winning personality to Ella Louise Giles. 
Charlotte Mouser wills her quiet and conservative manner to Margaret Marr. 
I, Frank Hammond, leave my sincere devotion for a certain blonde to Everette Dietz. 
Norman Whitener leaves his desire to become a newspaper editor to Charles Whitener. 
Clyde Jones leaves his guitar and his personality of becoming a great musician to Luther Heavner. 
Maude Kaylor bestows her good disposition and her ever-ready smile upon Frances Byers. 
I, Russell Hyder, with regret, will give my nut-cracker, which is used every period during the day 
and is guaranteed to work, to Thomas Henkle. 

0. K. Dietz leaves his ability always to be O.K. with the teachers to Charles Grove. 

We, Ralph Self. Carl Miller, will our devotion for each other to Madeline Goodson and Fanellia Leonard. 
T, Herbert Robinson, will my love for studying, especially Geometry, to Elma Broyles. 

1, Dinah Ennis, leave my affection for a certain Lenoir Rhyne athlete to Cornelia Marion. 
I, Margaret Marlow. will my admiration for Morganton boys to Peggy Cannon. 

I, Sam Colerider, confer my position in the theatre to Carl Brooks. 



f*ur^~-J z hrrTy rr ^t-x 



3i3 



HICKORY LOG 



I, Peggy Setzer, will my talent in singing to Hope Anderson. 

Mary Leonard bestows her neatness upon Jane Ball. 

We, Edith Burns, Opal Mitchell, leave our seats in Geometry class to any two Juniors who can get them. 

Dorothy Buchanan leaves her cute ways and friendly disposition to Ruth Kingsolver. 

Miller Sigmon leaves his John Barrymore profile to John Friday. 

Harry Steelman bestows upon Elaine Maness his remarkably high grades. 

I, Niles Compton. leave my artistic ability and popularity to Lois Wyant. 

I, Judson Parlier, leave my ability to annoy the teachers with my "witty" remarks to Billie Bolick. 

Rachel Maness and Richard Williams will and bequeath their locker in a dark corner to Weston Hat- 
field and Mary Hall. 

I, Jack Beck, want Richard Patterson to take my place as captain of the football squad. 

I, Auburn Poovey, do will and bequeath my attraction to girls to Franklin Carver. 

Russell Abee confers his love for typing to Suzanne Vander Linden. 

I, Phifer Berry, leave my ability to day dream on class to anyone who can get by with it. 

Melford Gaither wills his quietness, especially on classes, to Foy Hefner. 

I, Jean Williams, will and bequeath my ability to get invitations to State College dances to Ruth Ready. 

Fosteena Yarner commends her sincere love for men to Jane Whitener. 

Betty Bowles leaves her ability to stick to what she thinks (if she is the only one) to all who like to argue. 

I, A. C. Bovender, do will and bequeath my old Stacomb bottles to Orville Campbell. 

1. Jimmie Lohr, give my love and affection for the stronger sex to Mary Dudley Hamer. 

I, Harriet Cilley, leave my ability to get on the Honor Roll to Pauline Culpepper. 

Nancy Cline leaves her long hair and her pleasing ways to Carolyn Wolfe. 

I, Anita Bingham, will my ability to keep at least one boy on hand to Edith Phifer. 

I, Frances Whitener, will and bequeath my cosmetics and art of making up to Nancy Broome. 

I, Joan Whitener. with deep regret, will leave my cow to Dorothy Lytle. 

Mary Councill and Mary Ann Nail confer their quiet and dignified Senior ways to Maude Shuford 
and Billie Frazier. 

I, Mildred E. Miller, will my long walk 10 school to David Conklin. 

I . Carl Robinson, leave my love for school to Lonabelle Preslar. 

1, J. D. Vount, leave my ability to flirt to Helen Sherrill. 

I, Robert Adams, do hereby leave my unruly hair to Millard Prevette. 

I, Ruby Deal, with much sorrow, will give my golden locks to Ruby Lanier. 

We, Hendley Ellington and Armond Deal, will our abundant intelligence to Hilda Berry and Doris Yount. 

To Hazel Waggoner. Nellie Kate Ingold wills her everlasting smile. 

Max Hammond leaves his place as "Ladies Man" to T. W. Keever. 

1, David Gosnald, leave my nickname "Wimpy" to Royal Yount. 

Ruth Miller leaves her ability to get nice gifts (such as diamond rings and watches) from the opposite 
sex to Nancy Leach. 

Dorothy Hahn leaves her knowledge of commercial work to anyone who wishes to be a stenographer. 

I, Nina Hall, leave my place as cheer leader to Margaret Morrison. 

I, Ellen McFall, bestow my knowledge of English upon anyone weak in this subject. 

I, Elmer Troutman, leave my ability to keep quiet unless called upon to Richard Smith. 

I. Elizabeth Bowman, commend my friendly disposition to Mary Elizabeth Frans. 

Thelma Annas bequeaths her quiet but likable manner to Helen Teeter. 

Billy Denny leaves his determination to stick to what he thinks to Alene McClendon. 

Charlotte Jones bestows her good looks upon Elizabeth Pruitt. 

I. Richard Fullbright, leave my place as a messenger boy to Quinton Howell. 

Ernest Brown leaves his "wisecracks" to John George. 

I, Erskine Garrison, desiring that some one else might have my appealing manner (especially to the 
ladies) am willing to instruct R. L. Mitchell. 

I, Winifred Bryan, leave my love for the stronger sex to Margaret Grove. 

Mary Craven wills her friendliness to Willie Alice Poovey. 

I, John Walker, leave Ben Brooks part of my height and strength. 

I, Juanita Keon, will my love for all the boys to Dorothy Pope. 

Eve Tomlinson and Ruth Yount leave their charming voices and their places in the Glee Club to any 
two persons who are able to take their places, 

I, Agnes I card, confer my athletic ability to Imogene Casbion. 

I, Snow Helen Swatzel, will my beautiful brown eyes to Charlotte Allen. 

Edith Winkler bequeaths her extremely long eyelashes to Miss Frye. 

Richard Hicks wills his place as bus driver to anyone who will accept the responsibility. 

I. Eugenia Ivey, bestow my capability and dignified Senior air upon Margaret Cline. 

Ralph Pitts leaves his blue sleeveless sweater to anyone who wants it. Don't all speak at once! 

Charlie Bowman requests that Rusk Henry fill his place in the Dramatic Class. 

Jennie Sue Black leaves her blonde hair to Sarah Colerider. 

I, James Honeycutt, leave my abundant supply of hair to Joe Warlick. 

I, Margaret Flowers, want Faye Barrs to have my slender figure and also part of my height. 

Paul Wilson leaves his knowledge of Economics to anyone who needs it. 

I, Anna Mae Buff, do will and bequeath my love for Lenoir boys to Mildred Shuford. 

I, Henry Ueichard, leave my cleverness and good sense of humor to Bill Councill. 

We, Alonzo Bailey and Alvin Lowdermilk, want Winston Cloer and John Whitener to enjoy teasing 
people as we do. 

I, Johnson Huffman, wish that Audray Anderson could have my timidness. 

Margaret Yount wills her old freckle cream jars to Sadie Lowdermilk. 

I, Frank Deitz, entrust my strength at the center position in football to John Abernethy. 

I, Charles Henry, will gladly give to some Junior my knowledge of Geometry. Maybe it will help. 

To Johnnie Gilbert 1, Glenn Abee. will my tall, lanky figure. 

I, John Abee. do will and bequeath my superfluous flesh to Paul Bumbarger. 

J, Gordon Elrod, will my parking space to the one who gets it first. 

I. Mary Leigh Geitner. leave my love for the New Deal to Doris Cashion. 

Gladys Whitener leaves her curly locks to Gwendolyn Zerden. 

I, Julia Herman, confer my smiles and capability to Mary Elizabeth Simpson. 

In Witness thereof we, the Senior Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-six, have signed and sealed 
this, our will, the day of _ in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred Thirty-six. 



WITNESSES: Eor 



(Signed) THE SENIOR CLASS OF HICKORY HIGH SCHOOL. 
Pope, Mrs. James Winkler, Emma Fritz. 



Prrgr~^hH^^st%i^ft 



3L 



EDITOR, Betty Bowles 



34 Pages Today 



DAILY REVIEW 

Combined with Hickory Daily Record 



Established 1939 



Hickory, N. C, Saturday P.M., June 2, 1950 



Price, 5 Cents 



PLANE CRASH BARELY AVERTED 



RUMORS OF NEW 

Henry Reichard May 
Head Company 



RADIO CHAIN 



CHICAGO— June 2— (AP) — A new 
radio chain called the United Radio 
Broadcasting Company is in process 
of formation here. It is to be headed 
by Henry Reichard and will extend all 
over the world. 



WOMAN FLIER CROSSES POLE 

POINT BARROW— June 1— (AP) 
— Ellen Huffman, the famous aviatrix, 
has crossed the North Pole for the 
sixth time. She crossed it at one 
twenty-one yesterday afternoon. 



NEWS IN BRIEF 

WASHINGTON — J une 2— (AP) 
— Postmaster-General Frank Ham- 
mond stated yesterday that the budget 
for 1950 was balanced. 



HOLLYWOOD— J u n e 2— (AP)— 

The cinemactor, Eugene Sigmon, has 
just divorced his fifth wife. He says, 
"Never Again." 



WASHINGTON— June 2— (AP)— 
Representative Dorothy Buchanan in- 
troduced a bill into the House yester- 
day. It concerned automobile drivers' 
licenses. 



HOLLYWOOD — June 1, 1950 — 
Playwright Mary Councill, when in- 
terviewed here by Erskine Garrison, 
reporter for the Associated Press, 
said, "Everybody out here is nuts." 



WASHINGTON— June 2— (AP) — 
Ernestine Kingsolver, Business Ex- 
ecutive, is now here advising the 
President on whether the government 
should interfere with business. 



SOUTH CAROLINA — June 2— 
(AP)— Marjorie Yount and M. G. Set- 
zer are on their way to Europe to 
confer with some chemists over there 
on matters of importance to the 
world. 



Radio Engineers 

In Conference 



NEW YORK— June 2— (AP)— The 
most noted radio engineers of today, 
namely, Hendley Ellington, Richard 
Hefner, Elmer Troutman, O. K. Deitz, 
John Abee, and Norman Whitener are 
meeting to discuss a new phase in 
the science by radio. They are plan- 
ning to announce a new invention 
soon, it is said. 



HURRICANE ALMOST 

DESTROYS PLANE 

ST. LOUIS— June 2— (AP)— The 
storms in the west have caused much 
damage. Today if it had not been for 
the courage and skill of Pilot Armon 
Deal and his assistant, Boyce Forbes, 
the airmail would not have gone 
through. 



MAYORS MEET 



NEWTON— June 2— The Mayor of 
Newton, Carl Robinson, Mayor of 
Lincolnton, Brady Suttlemyre and 
Mayor of Lenoir, Alvin Lowdermilk, 
are meeting today to discuss how to 
further Public Safety. 



MEMBERS OF CABINET 

HURRY TO WASHINGTON 

WASHINGTON— June 2— (API- 
Willis Simpson, Secretary of Interior, 
Paul Wilson, Secretary of Navy, Max 
Preslar and Miller Sigmon, Attorney- 
General have all been out of Washing- 
ton for various reasons but they will 
all be back in time for the annual re- 
ception at the White House. 



Hickory Pilot Respon- 
sible for Safety of 
Passengers 

OMAHA— June 2— (AP)— An air- 
plane was forced down here today. 
The severe storms in the West caused 
the pilot, John Walker to lose his 
bearings. Only by his skill were the 
passengers saved. Those in the plane 
were: Herbert Robinson, big league 
baseball player; James Honeycutt, 
ship owner; Niles Compton, chamolo- 
gist; Ralph Self, rancher; Jack Rol- 
lins, eye specialist, and Marjorie Sig- 
mon, writer. 



NEW RADIO PROGRAMS 

HICKORY— June 2— (AP)— A new 
radio program will start at 8:30 P.M. 
Monday. The Carl Miller Bicycle 
Company is sponsoring Clyde Jones 
and Richard Hicks with H. D. Moretz 
as the announcer. 

Ruth Yount, singer, will be pre- 
sented at 9:00 o'clock by the Chevro- 
let Company of Hickory, which is 
owned by the well-known automobile 
body designer, Melford Gaither. Miss 
Betty Warlick will accompany Miss 
Yount on the piano. 



VERDICT EXPECTED SOON 

RALEIGH— J une 2— (AP)— The 
Supreme Court of North Carolina is 
expected to render a verdict on the 
constitutionality of Senator Richard 
Fulbright's Relief Bill soon. 

Chief Justice Johnson Huffman, and 
the associate justices, Alonzo Bailey 
and Margaret Cooke, are expected to 
vote in favor of it, while it is believed 
that Billy Denny, Aaron Beach and 
Robert Adams will not. 



ADVISERS ARE STILL 

IN WASHINGTON 

WASHINGTON— June 2— (AP) — 
A. C. Bovender, Charles Bowman, 
Jean Williams, Oscar Bishop, Henry 
Williams, Judson Parlier and Mary 
Lail, the President's unofficial ad- 
visors, but each famous for his suc- 
cess in the financial world, are still 
here after two weeks stay. They are 
discussing inflation. 



START FUND FOR 

UNDERNOURISHED 

HICKORY— June 2— Ruth Miller, 
Mary Cole Norris, Martha Thorn- 
brough and Gladys Whitener are 
starting a fund for the undernour- 
ished children in the city. They have 
done much in philanthropic work. 



n 



Saturday P.M., June 2, 1950 



DAILY REVIEW 



Page 10 



SOCIETY 



HOSPITAL STAFF FETED HERE 

The staff of the Steelman Hospital 
was entertained at the Country Club 
by the owner and founder of the Hos- 
pital, Harry Steelman. Dancing was 
enjoyed until a late hour. The music- 
was furnished by an excellent orches- 
tra led by Auburn Poovey. The doc- 
tors present were: Mary Craven, Joan 
Whitener, Rachel Maness, and Rich- 
ard Williams. The nurses who at- 
tended were: Aileen Abee, Edith 
Burns, Ronalda Coulter, Opal 
Mitchell, Dorothy Throneburg, Rachel 
Rutledge, Vivian Rink and Edith 
Winkler. Others were also present 
who were not connected with the 
Hospital. 



MISS BRYAN ENTERTAINS 

RALEIGH— June 2— Miss Winifred 
Bryan, the Secretary of State, enter- 
tained Misses Mary Ann Nail, Mar- 
garet Flowers and Martha Moretz be- 
fore they left for a trip abroad on 
Monday. Those present were Harriet 
Cilly, scientist; Mary Legh Geitner, 
prominent socialite; Iris Abernethy, 
President of the United Rainbow 
Girls of America; Mary Belle Tate, 
interior decorator; Ellen McFall, poet; 
Max Hammond, commercial artist; 
Jack Beck, professional football star; 
Charles Henry, business man, and 
David Gosnold, the French Ambassa- 
dor who is in America at present. 



NEW YORK— June 2— (AP)— Rus- 
sell Smith, manager of the American 
football team, is trying to get the 
great player, James Garrett, from the 
Universal team managed by Wesley 
Sherrill. 



SALT LAKE CITY— June 2— (AP) 
— Gordon Elrod won the Automobile 
Race yesterday at Salt Lake City. He 
also broke the speed record, making 
400 miles an hour. 



Personals 

Miss Wilma Davidson, Home Eco- 
nomics teacher in the Claremont High 
School, is visiting in Charlotte. 



Miss Nihla Lael has returned home 
from a trip to the Orient. 



HICKORY— J u n e 2— Mayor of 
Hickory, Phifer Berry, has just ap- 
pointed C. C. Mull Chief of Police 
since Herbert Seabock has resigned 
that position to be City Manager. 



NEWTON— June 2— Julia Herman, 
criminal lawyer, and her private sec- 
retaries, Clara Hefner, Katherine Hil- 
ton and Mildred Hale, are attending 
court here. 



Miss Jennie Sue Black, Miss Addie 
Locke, Miss Mildred E. Miller, Miss 
Mildred Canipe, and Miss Edith Pope, 
all of whom are teachers in the local 
schools, are attending a teachers' 
meeting in New York City. 



COLERIDER THEATRE 

Today Last Times 

RUSSELL HYDER 

Presents 
ANITA BINGHAM 

IN 

"RED HEADS" 

A Thrilling Love Drama 

Also 

MONDAY, JUNE 4 
We are happy to give you one of 
our own home town girls who has 
made good. One of the world's great- 
est actresses will be here In Person. 
None other than 

JOSEPHINE MORETZ 

The picture on the screen will be 

"THE TWO HAIRPINS" 

With 
FRANCES WHITENER 

AND 

FOSTEENA VARNER 

Don't Miss This Feature Attraction! 

COLERIDER THEATRE 

June 4 



Misses Nellie Kate Ingold and Eu- 
genia Ivey, well-known musicians, are 
in Forest City with Miss Dinah Ennis 
who will be married soon. 



Miss Nina Hall is home after hav- 
ing been in Paris for the last few 
months buying clothes for New York 
concerns. 



Miss Mary Leonard and Miss Peggy 
Setzer will leave Monday for a trip 
abroad. They are planning to spend 
three months traveling in Europe. 



Miss Eve Tomlinson and Miss 
Nancy Cline, both of whom have been 
studying abroad, are reported to be 
engaged to millionaires. Who the 
lucky men are has not been disclosed. 



S. S. ARKANSAS— June 2— Turner 
James and Howard White have been 
dispatched with the U. S. Marines to 
the Phillippines to settle the disputes 
there. 



Misses Jimmy Lohr and Annie Mae 
Buff are in Alaska. They will arrive 
home next month. 



SPORTS 

CHICAGO— June 2— (AP)— Coach 
Russel Abee of the Chicago Tiger 
Professional football team says that 
Glenn Abee and Charles Kanupp will 
be able to play Saturday against 
Coach Frank Deitz's New York Tor- 
nadoes. 



NEW YORK— June 2— (AP)— A 
five-day bicycle race was won Friday 
at Madison Square Garden by Ernest 
Brown. 



ADS 



ZACK GUTHRIE CIRCUS 

Tuesday, June 5 

GIGANTIC PARADE 

Six Rings 

Featuring the Famous 

Cowboy 

JACK CORDELL 

With 

Eubet Bowman 

juanita kean 

Kenneth Keever 



BEAUTY BOX BEAUTY SHOP 

We Give Perfeet Service 

OPERATORS 

Charlotte Mauser 
Snow Helen Swatxel 

Mary Sigmon 
Mary Laura Huffman 

Ruth Beach 

Evelyn Austin, Owner 

Charlotte Jones, Beauty Specialist 



HAHN SCHOOL OF 
STENOGRAPHY 

With our competent teachers you 
will be an expert stenographer in 
months. 

Just ask for one of these excellent 
instructors: 

Louise Freeman 

Maude Miller 

Elizabeth Wilson 

Dorothy Hawn 

Margaret Marlowe 

Mildred Miller 

Dorothy Bostain 

Agnes Icard 

Aileen Yount 

Helen Cater 

Maude Kaylor 

Elizabeth Bowman 

Thelma Annas 

Ophelia Hahn, Owner and Manager 



DETECTIVE AGENCY 

We find dogs, cats, men and women. 

We are always ready to serve you. 

Ruby Deal 

Joe Webb 

Albert Bolick 

Ralph Pitts 

J. D. Yount 

Thomas Icard 



u 






Wp^ 











Jean Williams 

Most athletic girl 
Most popular girl 
Most attractive girl 
Friendliest girl 
Best all-round 



James Garrett 

Most popular boy 
Best all-round boy 
Friendliest boy 
Most reserved boy 



Mary Leonard 

Neatest girl 



Henry Reichard 

Neatest boy 



Winifred Bryan 

Wittiest girl 



JUDSON PARLIER 
Wittiest boy 



Josephine Moretz 

Prettiest girl 



Melford Gaither 

Best looking boy 
Most attractive boy 



Mary Councill 

Most studious girl 
Most reserved girl 



Harry Steelman 

Most studious boy 



Jack Beck 

Most athletic boy 



W. D. Cottrell 

The Sentor's friend 




HICKORY LOG 



SENIOR CLASS SONG 



We love to sing of Hickory High, 

Our noble Alma Mater, 

Of all the schools she is the best, 

And none will e'er be greater. 

The ties that bind us to high school days, 

No earthly power can sever, 

We'll e'er up-hold the green and gold, 

And our class-mates dear forever. 

CHORUS 
Farewell, dear high school, 
Guardian of our past, 
We'll honor thee and love thee 
While life shall last. 



When we have left these hallowed halls 
Upon our graduation, 
Another throng shall sing our song 
Of loyal adoration. 
' The memory of our high school life 
Shall never fade, no, never. 
We'll all be true '3 6 to you 
And the green and gold forever. 

CHORUS 
Farewell, dear classmates, 
Friends of our youth 
We'll pledge to thee our loyalty. 
Honor, and truth. 



SENIOR CLASS RESOLUTIONS 



The following set of resolutions, drawn up by a committee were unanimously approved by 
the graduating class of 1936: 

"Whereas, we, the senior class of nineteen hundred thirty-six, have reached the last, year 
of our high school career, whereas, we are beginning to see the value of a high school education 
to one in life, and whereas, we want to make known to the student body, faculty, and the 
public in general our appreciation of the opportunities given us by this school and our aims 
for making this last year measure up to standards that befit this city in which we live, 

"Now therefore, be it resolved: 

"First, that we be loyal to the school by upholding the standards set for the school, by 
helping the underclassmen in every way possible, by doing all in our power to make the school 
better, by trying our best to gain more knowledge, and by developing a finer spirit toward our 
fellow student. 

"Second, that we show our school spirit by taking part in all school activities such as. 
aiding our school teams by attending games, taking part on programs when asked, and supporting 
the various activities in every way we can. 

"Third, that we be loyal to our class by taking part in all its activities, by supporting the 
class in everything it undertakes for its betterment, by attending all class meetings, by expressing 
ourselves while there instead of letting the class officers and a few others do all the work, and 
by keeping a fine, cheerful class spirit instead of being a habitual knocker. 

"Fourth, that our conduct be above reproach and that we show a spirit of courtesy and 
kindness at all times — 

(A) — In the classroom by giving undivided attention to the teacher, by becoming behavior, 
and by refraining from marking on the walls and desks. 

(B) — In the assembly room by giving undivided attention to the programs, by being 
courteous to all performers at all times, and by refraining from hissing and booing. 

(C) — In the halls by avoiding congestion, by not running, and by refraining from loud 
talking. 

(D) — At games by being courteous to the opposing team, and by being good losers as 
well as good winners. 

"Fifth, that we shall each endeavor to maintain a high standard of scholarship — an average 
on all subjects of at least 70, not making this our highest goal but trying to make the grade 
which suffices for our personal capacity. 

"Sixth, that we shall develop our personalities by correct posture 
and by neat appearance. 

"In witness hereof this seventeenth day of October in the year 
hundred thirty-five. 

(Signed) 

Mary Councill 
Margaret Flowers 
harry steelman." 



carriage, a clean body, 
of our Lord, nineteen 



Patre—PoT t y ■ ni 'u 



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JUNIORS 



ELBERT IVEY MEMORIAL UBRARt 
HICORY N npT '' CAROLINA 



4* 



JUNIOR GLASS 
OFFICERS 



Richard Smith 
President 



John Cline 
Vice-President 



Weston Hatfield 
Secretary -Treasurer 






43 














it 



JUNIOR 
MARSHALS 

Paul Bumbarger 
Louise Pruitt 



Weston Hatfield 



CORALIE WlTHERSPOON 



Melba Bowman 
Imogene Cashion 



Evelyn Troutman 



Helen Sherrill 



Mary Beth Kuhn 



Madalene Goodson 



Fanellia Leonard 



Bill Councill 



Hi 



HICKORY LOG 




Dorothy 
Abee 


Linda 
Abee - 


Bob 
Aiken 


Anne 
Adams 


Margaret 
aderholdt 


Ned 
Armstrong 


Jack 
Anderson 


Hope 
Anderson 


Helen 
Anderson 


William 
Anthony 


Anna K. 
Annas 


Hazel 
Barnes 


Hilda 
Berry 


Howard 
Barnes 


Melba 
Bowman 


Nelson 
Brown 


Ruth 
Boatwright 


Julius 
Abernethy 


Paul 
Bumbarger 


Helen 
Brookshire 


Winston 
Cloer 


Zenobia 
Brown 


Elmer 
Bowman 


Sara 
Clark 


Peggy 
Cannon 


Ellis 
Garrison 


Imogene 
Cashion 


Robert 

Carpenter 


Billy 
Carpenter 


John 
Cline 


Page Forty-six 













HICKORY LOG 




Bill 
Councill 

Grace 
Deal 

Ned 
Eckard 

Inez 
Hass 

Mac 
Teeter 



Pauline 
Culpepper 


R. F. 
POOVEV 


Juanita 
Davis 


Jimmie 
Craig 


Helen 
Day 


Herschel 
Starnes 


Alma 
Eckard 


James 
Creech 


Miriam 
Euliss 


Hugh 
Davis 


ElLLEEN 
FULBRIGHT 


Ila 
Fulk 


Lewis 
Elrod 


Madalene 

GOODSON 


Bonita 
Hamby 


Helen 
Hawn 


Ray 

Flowers 


Helen 
Hahn 


Nadine 
Hawn 


Conrad 
Fritz 


Louise 
Herman 


Mary Alice 
Hilts 


Ned 
Frye 


Stella 
Honeycutt 


Madeline 
Howard 



Page Forty-seven 



^$fe 



HICKORY LOG 




Lorraine 
Howard 

Garlan 
Hardin 

Ruby 
Lanier 

Rusk 
Henry 

Elaine 
Maness 



Etheline 
Huggins 

Frances 
Kennedy 

Nancy 
Leach 

Ruby 

LlNGERFELT 

Mildred 
Marr 



Billy 
Gilbert 


Fortuna 
Huffman 


Alice 
Hyder 


Harold 
Guest 


Judy 
Kerley 


Weston 
Hatfield 


Ruth 
Kingsolver 


Mary Beth 
Kuhn 


Robert 

Hahn 


Fanellia 
Leonard 


Elizabeth 
Little 


Luke 
Heavner 


Sadie 
Lowdermilk 


Elmer 
Hollar 


Dorothy 
Lytle 


Helen 
McCoy 


Merle 

HOUCK 


Lois 
Mize 


Nadine 
Miller 


Quinton 
Howell 



Page Forty-eight 



HICKORY LOG 
















fc.tAfe 





Marion 
Morgan 


Virginia 
Morrison 


Raymond 
Huggins 


Nell 
Moser 


Margaret 
Mowery 


Frank 
Innes 


Paul 

Jones 


Helen 
Parlier 


WlLMA 

Parsons 


Harold 
Keever 


Edith 
Phifer 


Lona Bell 
Preslar 


Louise 
Pruitt 


Nell 
Pritchard 


T. W. 
Keever 


Wille Alice 
Poovey 


Mary E. 
Regan 


Ben 
Laney 


Furchis 
Little 


Gladys 
Rice 


Otha 
Rice 


Marvin 
McCaskill 


Helen 
Rockett 


Eleanor 
Roseman 


lizabeth 
Reedy 


Ruth 
Reedy 


Carl 
Moser 


Etta 
suttlemyre 


Marjorie 
Setzer 


Billy 
McRorie 

Page Forty-nine 



m 



HICKORY LOG 




Paul 
Parlier 


Helen 
Sherrill' 


Adelaide 
Shuford 


Richard 
Patterson 


Maud 
Shuford 


Mildred 
Shuford 


Dorothy 

SlGMON 


Mary E. 
Simpson 


Alwyn 
Phillips 


Hazel 
Starnes 


Edna 
Steppe 


Barnard 
Phillips 


Marion 
Poovey 


Betty 
Stroup 


Rachel 
Suggs 


Paul 
Reinhardt 


Lila R. 
Sullivan 


Sarah 
Suther 


Ruby 
hroneburg 


Evelyn 
Troutman 


Sarah 
Fowler 


Suzanne 
VanderLinden 


Hazel 
Waggoner 


Richard 
Smith 


G. C. 
Starnes 


Ruby 
White 


Helen 
Winebarger 


Kenneth 
Starnes 


Coralie 
Witherspoon 


Carolyn 
Wolfe 



Page Fifty 



HICKORY LOG 




Johnny 
Gilbert 


Minnie 
Workman 


Bill 
White 


Lois 

Wyant 


Thomas 
Walker 


Doris 
Yount 


Billie 
Frazier 


Bill 
Wise 


Sarah v. 
Colerider 


John 
Whitener 


Nancy 
Clay 


H. H. 
Sigmon 


Harry 
Wise 


Eva 
Miller 


Franklin 
Carver 

Faye 
Barrs 


Mary D. 
Hamer 

Helen 
Kiser 


Orville 
Campbell 


Frankie 
Flowers 



Page Fifty-one 



& 



HICKORY LOG 



HISTORY OF JUNIOR GLASS 

( With apologies to Longfellow) 

Listen, my friends, and you shall hear 
Of the ranks of students gathered here 
In the fall of September thirty-three 
Soon submissive to new decree. 

Well all will remember that awful fear 

Of the sophs who threatened in so much force 

To be up in arms with spirits of fire 

To any trespassers or flaunters of ire; 

Beneath their strong sway "rats" bowed the head 

While inwardly whispering — all will be well; 

For suddenly, all his thoughts are bent 
On a shadowy something far away — 
When the grade beacons open to show the way 
To the Sophomore rank that preens and gloats 
Over newfound dignity soon to be spent. 

And lo! As he climbs toward learning's height, 
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light: 
He springs to the task, the books' pages he turns 
But lingers and gazes, till soon on his sight 
A second lamp as a guide star burns. 

A hurry of Juniors in the halls we meet — ■ 

A glimpse of a class — flying fearless and fleet — 

That is all! And yet through the splotches of gloom and light 

The Juniors of Central High are riding aright. 

And so from our class comes the spirit strong 

To aspire to the heights and battle long. 

Through all our history, thus far made, 

In hours of joy or labor paid. 

Members of this class have wakened to hear 

The age-old message from learning's sphere .... 



Page Fit ty-tioo 



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SOPHOMORES 



J5t 



SOPHOMORE 
CLASS OFFICERS 



Mary Hall 
President 



Alda Gregory 

Vice-President 



Edward Hay 
Secretary -Treasurer 




HICKORY LOG 




Sophomore Girls 




Sophomore Boys 



Page Fifty-five 



£4 



HICKORY LOG 



SOPHOMORE GLASS HISTORY 

At least we, the class of '38, have left the "green'' stage and reached that peak of superiority 
known as Sophomore. After a very eventful Freshman year, we are well launched upon a busy 
and interesting second year. 

During the latter part of the Freshman year, the main event for the girls was the Junior- 
Senior Banquet, but both boys and girls took part in the May Day exercise. 

At our first meeeting as Sophomores, we elected officers and a class advisor. Again this 
year as last, we are well represented in every phase of school activities open to us. As a class, 
and a large one at that, we will strive to be one of the best that Hickory High School -has 
turned out in a long time. 

— Edward Hay. 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS 



Helen Abee 
Betty Allen 
Madge Alran 
Audrey Anderson 
Frances Barks 
Dorothy Barger 
Jane Bass 
Lois Bishop 
Carrie Sue Bolick 
Mary Lou Bolick 
Marquesette Bovvan 
Bridget Bowman . 
Colleen Brown 
Elma Broyles 
Nancy Broome 
Fae Bumgarner 
Florine Burns 
Lola Lee Campbell 
Margaret Cline 
Mary Frank Colerider 
Aileen Craig 
Dorothy Creech 
Margaret Davidson 



Helen Deitz 
Margaret Deitz 
Nettie Ellington 
Mary Elizabeth Frans 
Aleene Gaitiier 
Ada Gardner 
Peggy Garth 
Edith Gord 
Alda Gregory 
Margaret Grove 
Mary Hall 
Helen Herman 
Sara Hester 
Lilly Holland 
norien honeycutt 
Hazel Huffman 
Rose Mary Huffman 
Helen Huggins 
Hilda Huggins 
Inez Hunt 
Frances Johnson 
Winnie Lea Keever 



Libby Jane Linn 
Emogene Locke 
Cornelia Marion 
Betty Martin 
Anna C. Miller 
Thelma Nelson 
Margie Phifer 
Otelia Poovey 
Pauline Pope 
Mae Prestwood 
Amelia Pruitt 
Elizabeth Pruitt 
Pearl Reep 
Mildred Reinhardt 
Bel ma Rice 
Alice Ruth Setzer 
Rosemary Setzer 
Etta Sherrill 
Lillian Sherrill 
Arcola Smith 
Sally Jane Smith 
Carroll Starnes 
Janice Stevenson 



Caroline Suttlemyre 
Doris Swatzel 
Mary Lee Taylor 
Helen Teeter 
Betty Sue Thomason 
Evelyn Troutman 
Ruth Underwood 
Doris Yount 
Doris Anne Yount 
Mary Sousie Yount 
Marguerite Yount 
Thelma Walker 
Edna Warren 
Martha Wells 
Doris Whitener 
Hazel Whitener 
Helen Whitener 
Jane Whitener 
Kathleen Whitener 
Rachel Whitener 
Lois Wyant 
Virginia Wyant 
Gwendolyn Zerden 



SOPHOMORE BOYS 



Junior Barger 
Troy Barger 
Edward Banks 
Wallace Beamen 
S. A. Black 
Malcolm Bolch 
Howard Bowman 
Robert Bolick 
Carl Brooks 
Carl Brown 
Jack Burch 
James Burch 
Stirling Carpenter 
Charles Carpenter 
Charles Campbell 
E. D. Cline 
C. L. Clinton 
David Conklin 
Albert Crump 
Grady Deal 



Terrell Deaton 
Louie Eckard 
Seth Frye 
John Friday 
Connolly Gamble 
John George 
Charles Grove 
Thomas Golden 
Bill Hart 
James Hart 
Edward Hay 
Edward Herman 
T. L. Henkle 
George Houck 
Glenn Hudson 
Willard Huffman 
McCoy Huffman 
Eugene Hunter 
James Hyder 



S. A. Isenhour 
Ottis Johnson- 
Kyle Kingsolver 
Ray Lail 
Joe Landis 
Forrest Lawing 
Marshall Mauney 
Harry Murphy 
J. Belvin Patrick 
Gerald Plaster 
Millard Prevette 
Grady Ritchie 
Donald Rogers 
George Rollins 
Robert Rudolph 
Lee Roy Senter 
Fred Sharpe 
Sam Short 
Sam Wells Short 



Jerry Sigmon 
R. A. Sigmon 
Freeman Sigmon 
George Simpson 
Phillip Suttlemyre 
Eugene Starnes 
Roby Sutton 
Bayne Teague 
Festus Teague 
Albert Templeton 
R. L. Thornburg 
Gorden Thomason 
J. D. Thomason 
Charles Roy Yount 
Royal Yount 
George Warlick 
Joe Warlick 
Stephen Warren 
Jack Webb 
Paul Whisnant 



Page Fifty-six 



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FRESHMEN 



FRESHMAN 
GLASS OFFICERS 



John Hamby 

President 



Joy Abernethy 
Vice-President 



Peggy Sinclair 
Secretary -Treasurer 




HICKORY LOG 




Freshman Girls 




Freshman Boys 



Page Fifty-nine 



HICKORY LOG 



FRESHMAN GLASS HISTORY 

The large Freshman Class of '35 and '3 6 began its journey through High School with 
high hopes of a successful ending. 

To many of us, the beautiful Claremont Central High School building has been the 
objective to which we have looked and for which we have longed through the seven years of 
Grammar School. And now we are here, happy that this much of our High School life has 
been successfully experienced, and hoping that the remaining years will do credit to all of us. 
We are well represented in the various school activities, and school spirit is being rapidly 
developed. 

Our efficient teachers are appreciated more and more as the weeks roll by. and we hope 
this appreciation is mutual. 

With each rapidly passing day we are becoming more at home in our new "school home." 
we are becoming better acquainted with our class-mates and teachers, and we have a better 
understanding of High School methods. 

Therefore, we, the class of '39 will heartily endeavor to attain the standards set by the 
classes above us. 



-Robert Moss. 



FRESHMAN GIRLS 



Joy Abernethy 

Edna Austin 
Faye Bailey 
Janeixa Bivens 
Ruby Black 
Edith Bolick 
Marie Bolick 

MODELL BrITTAI N 

Colene Brown 
Gwendolyn Candler 
Margaret Carpenter 
Doris Cashion 
June Christian 
Janice Cloninger 
Ethel Cohen 
Dorothy Coulter 
Rachel Crider 
Colleen Davis 
Rosalie Deal 
Aileen Deitz 
Virginia Deitz 
Geneva Eckard 
Dorothy Ennis 
Charlcie Fincannon 
Margaret Finley 
Hilda Flowers 



Ernestine Frye 
Dorcas Gilbert 
Sara Lee Gifford 
Eloise Giles 
Louise Good 
Hazel Hah n 
Bobby Shell Hardin 
Janet Howell 
Marcelle Hawn 
Zelma Hawn 
Juanita Henkel 
Lorraine Hickman 
Daisy Dean Hines 
Margaret Hoke 
Martha Lee Huffman 
Mary Nell Johnson- 
Cat herine Justice 
Mabel Kerby 
Madge Kerby 
Marcelle Klassitt 
Mabel Lane 
Martha Lane 
Mabel Laney 
Ruth Leonard 
Martha Lentz 
Aileen Lowman 



Zora Lowdermilk 
Minnie Martin 
Aileene McLinden 
Dorothy Merrit 
Mary Jo Messick 
Margaret Miller 
Ruth Moose 
Margaret Morrison 
Virginia Moser 
Lloma Nell Mullins 
Clara Murphy 
Sealla Nance 
Helen Peeler 
Mary Poovey 
Dorothy Pope 
I da Propst 
Katherine Ppopst 
Mary Brent Ramseur 
Kathleen Reinhardt 
Virginia Rhodes 
Elsie Roberts 
Terrisa Rowe 
Alda Seaboch 
Elizabeth Setzer 
Miriam Shannon 
Ruth Sherrili, 



Margaret Sherrill 
Elizabeth Smufokd 
Peggy Sinclair 
Elizabeth Sm rni 
Margaret Sm r i u 
Janice Stevenson 
Lona Belle Teague 
Rachel Templeton 
Jean Turnlyfell 
Dorothy Van Tassel 
Emma Moe Yoder 
Alice Yount 
Louise Wakefield 
Dorothy Waklick 
Clara Watkins 
Jane Weaver 
Hazel White 
Sara Jane White 
Margaret White 
Ruby Nell White 
Helen Whitener 
Rachel Williams 
Louise Wise 
Katherine Wilson 
Gordie V. Wyant 
Vivian Zimmerman 



FRESHMAN BOYS 



Allison Abernethy 
John Abernethy 
Howard Barger 
Charles Barrs 
Lloyd Benfi eld 
Ralph Bolick 
Billy Bolick 
Paul Bolick 
Boruy Bowles 
Ben Brooks 
Robert Brown 
Billy Busby 
Ronda Buchanan 
Delman Burns 
Warren Canipe 
Ted Cashion 
Stirling Carpenter 
B. C. Cannon, Jr. 
Tom Clay 
Paul Clontz 
Thurston Cole 
Boyce Collins 
Carol Day 
Bobby Dobbins 
Joe Donkel 
Jim my Edwards 



D. G. Frye 
Forrest Gaines 
Bill George 
Joe Greene 
Joh n Hahn 
John Ham by 
Willard Hand 
Fred Harris, Jr. 
James Hart 

D. L. Hartzoge 
Earl Hefner 
Ernest Hefner 
Billy Hicks 
Clifford Hilton 
Junior Hilson 

E. P. Huffman. Jr. 
Forest Huffman 
Henry Huggins 
Thomas Icarp 
Ben nie Janette 
Billy Jackson 
Arthur Johnson 
Vernon Lackey 
Willard Lail 
Robert Lail 



Hal Lail 
Melvin Lowman 
Franklin Little 
Willie Earl Lyon 
Edmund Lutz 
Albert Miller 
D. C. Miller 
Lester Miller 
Telis Miller 
Clan Mise 
R. L. Mitchel 
Therman Milan 
Ralph Montgomery 
Tom Morris 
Robert Moss 
James Nance 
Adam Penley 
Daniel Poovey 
Bun Pope 
Tom Pruitt, Jr. 
Lenill Reinhardt 
James Reynolds 
Westly Rink 
Edgar Robinson 
Walter Seabock 
Jimmy Simpson 



Romas Sigmon 
Henry Sharp 
Harold Shell 
Frank Short 
R. C. Slayton 
Harry Smith 
Clarence Sparks 
Everette Starnes 
Sanford Steelman 
H. G. Stevens, Jr. 
Warren Sutton 
Harold Yoder 
Adrian Yount 
Everette Yount 
Billy Wagner 
Scott Watson 
Willard Weaver 
John Webb 
Ned Williams 
Horace Whitner 
Joe Whitener 
Jacob Whitener 
Scott Whitener 
Charles Whitener 
Blake Whisenhunt 
Carl Witrerspoon 



Page Sixty 



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Mill 



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D 



ACTIVITIES 



// 



HICKORY LOG 



*>o c mi 



• | ft *-f t 4,4 ^ 



t '< 



GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Eve Tomlinson 

Elmer Troutman 

Joan Whitener 

Weston Hatfield 

imogene cashion 

Mrs. Vena Little Goode 



President 

.... Vice-President 
Secretary 

. . . . Treasurer 
. . Reporter 

. Director 



Hope Anderson 

Zenobia Brown 

Lola Lee Campbell 

Peggy Cannon 

Sara Virginia Colerider 

Sarah Fowler 

Mary Elizabeth Frans 

Aleene Gaither 

Margaret Grove 

Bobbie Shell Hardin 

Helen Hahn 

Sara Hester 

Rose Mary Huffman 

Helen Huggins 

Hilda Huggins 

Nellie Kate Ingold 



MEMBERS 

Nancy Leach 
Margaret Morrison 
Elizabeth Pruitt 
Mary Elizabeth Regan 
Virginia Stine 
Eve Tomlinson 
, Evelyn Troutman 
Suzanne VanderLinden 
Jane Whitener 
Carolyn Wolfe 
Virginia Wyant 
Ruth Yount 
Imogene Cash ion 
Doris Cashion 
Mary Peeler Craven 
Mary Hall 



Mildred Shuford 
M. Evelyn Troutman 
Fosteena Varner 
Joan Whitener 
h. d. Moretz 
Connolly Gamble 
Elmer Troutman 
Robert Bolick 
Weston Hatfield 
Hendley Ellington 
Johnnie Walker 
Harry Wise 
Henry Sharpe 
Julius Abernethy 
Henry Williams 
Paul Bumbarger 



Page Sixty-two 



HICKORY LOG 




BAND 

OFFICERS 

Joan WHITENER President 

DOROTHY LYTLE Secretary 

Charles Grove Treasurer 

EUGENIA IVEY Librarian 

Ellis Garrison Reporter 

Professor William Goldman Director 



MEMBERS 



Trumpets 
Eugenia Ivey 
Ellis Garrison 
Robert Rudolph 
Preston Rhyne. Jr. 

Alto Horn 
Richard Patterson 

Saxophone 
Margaret Grove 



Clarinets 
Dorothy Lytle 
J. D. Sample 
James Rhyne 

Flute 
Gerald Plaster 

Trombones 
Joan Whitener 
Charles Grove 



Page Sixty-three 



HICKORY LOG 







ART CLUB 



W. D. COTTRELL Director 



Betty Bowles 
Niles Compton 
Josephine Moretz 



Martha Moretz 
Max Hammond 
Walter Seabock 



Page Sixty-four 



HICKORY LOG 




STUDENT COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

James Garrett President 

HENRY REICHARD Vice-President 

NlNA HALL Secretary -Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Richard Smith 
John Cline 
Weston Hatfield 
Mary Hall 



Alda Gregory 
Edward Hay 
Peggy Sinclair 
John Hamby 



Joy Abernethy 



Page Sixty-five 



HICKORY LOG 




THE WORTH WHILE CLUB 

MOTTO : The man worth while is the man with a smile when everything 
goes dead wrong. 

AIM: To always wear a smile and do the things worth while. 

OFFICERS 
Weston Hatfield President 

PAUL BUMBARGER Vice-President 

HARRY WISE Secretary-Treasurer 

Richard Patterson Censor 



Bill Gilbert 
Mary D. Hamer 
Nancy Leach 
Mary Elizabeth Regan 
Billy McRorie 
Richard Patterson 
Conrad Fritz 
Mildred E. Miller 
Edith Phifer 
Richard Thompson 
Weston Hatfield 



MEMBERS 

Ruby Lanier 
Suzanne VanderLinden 
Elizabeth Little 
Robert Carpenter 
Lydia Henkel 
Madeline Howard 
Adelaide Shuford 
Ethelene Huggins 
Sabra Louise Pruitt 
Dorothy Lytle 



Harry Wise 
Leverne Deitz 
Paul Bumbarger 
Bill Councill 
Helen Winebarger 
Ben Laney 
Ned Frye 
Zenobia Brown 
Evelyn Troutman 
Ellis Garrison 
Mrs. J. B. Winkler 



Page Sixty-six 



HICKORY LOG 




THE ANONYMOUS CLUB 

OFFICERS 

James Garrett President 

Josephine Moretz Vice-President 

MELFORD GAITHER : Secretary 

MARY COUNCILL Treasurer 

Peggy Setzer Critic 

Millie Kate McComb Advisor 



BOYS 

John Abee 
Robert Adams 
Phifer Berry 
Ernest Brown 
Niles Compton 
Jack Cordell 
Richard Fulbright 
Melford Gaither 
James Garrett 
Max Hammond 
James Honeycutt 
Johnson Huffman- 
Max Preslar 



MEMBERS 

Herbert Robinson 
M. G. Setzer 
Eugene Sigmon 
Harry Steelman 

GIRLS 

Dorothy Bostain 
Betty- Bowles 
Winifred Bryan 
Dorothy Buchanan- 
Annie Mae Buff 
Harriett Cilley 
Mary Councill 
Margaret Flowers 



Mary Elizabeth Geitner 
Jimmie Lohr 
Ellen McFall 
Margaret Marlow 
Josephine Moretz 
Martha Moretz 
Mary Ann Nail 
Edith Pope 
Rachel Rutledge 
Peggy Setzer 
Betty Warlick 
Frances Whitener 
Gladys Whitener 
Joan Whitener 



Page Sixtu-secen 



HICKORY LOG 




HI-Y 

OFFICERS 

A. C. BOVENDER President 

DAVID GOSNOLD Vice-President 

Weston Hatfield Secretary 

PAUL BUMBARGER Treasurer 



judson parlier 
Jimmie Craig 
Henry Sharp 
Julius Abernethy 
Bobby Aiken 
Connolly Gamble 
Eugene Hunter 



MEMBERS 

Henry Reichard 
Harry Wise 
Hendley Ellington 
John Walker 
Norman Whitener 
Garland Hardin 
Orville Campbell 
Gordon Thomason 



Page Sixty-eight 



HICKORY LOG 




LE GERGLE FRANGAIS GAI 

OFFICERS 

MARTHA MORETZ President 

MARJORIE SETZER Vice-President 

MARGARET FLOWERS Secretary-Treasurer 

Adelaide Shuford Advisor 



MEMBERS 



Anita Bingham 
Betty Bowles 
Winifred Bryan 
Paul Bumbarger 
Imogene Cashion 
Ranalda Coulter 
Bill Councill 
Mary Councill 
Armon Deal 
Margaret Flowers 
Richard Fulbright 
Ellis Garrison 
Nina Hall 

Mary Dudley Hamer 
Weston Hatfield 
Helen Kiser 



Mary Beth Kuhn 
Dorothy Lytle 
Rachel Maness 
Ellen McFall 
Martha Moretz 
Marian Morgan 
Virginia Morrison 
Mary Ann Nail 
Richard Patterson 
Edith Phifer 
Louise Pruitt 
Marjorie Setzer 
Peggy Setzer 
Mildred Shuford 
Harry Steelman 
Betty Warlick 



Page Sixty-nine 



HICKORY LOG 




STABT1E5 



HOME ECONOMIC CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Mary LEGH GEITNER President 

Dorothy Buchanan . .■ Vice-President 

Martha Thornbrough Secretary 

ADDIE LOCKE Treasurer 

NANCY CLINE Social Chairman 

EVE TOMLINSON Social Chairman 

JOAN WHITENER Reporter 

Page Seventy 






HICKORY LOG 




WIGS AND MASQUE CLUB 

OFFICERS 
Josephine Moretz President 

BlLLIE FRAZIER Vice-President 

HARRY STEELMAN Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Mary Elizabeth Simpson H. D. Moretz 

Nancy Leach Weston Hatfield 

Martha Wells Hendley Ellington 

Aleene Gaither Elmer Troutman 

Margaret Morrison Garland Hardin 

Anita Bingham Carolyn Wolfe 

Winifred Bryan Bobby Shell Hardin 

Mary Ann Nail Martha Lentz 

Fosteena Varner Julius Abernethy 



Page Seventy-one 



HICKORY LOG 




BOYS' MONOGRAM CLUB 

OFFICERS 

James Garrett President 

LUKE HEAVNER Vice-President 

JOHN CLINE Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Luke Heavner Jack Cordell Marshall Mauney 

John Cline Jack Abee John Friday 

Jack Beck Clyde Jones H. H. Sigmon 

Russell Abee J. D. Thompson Paul Wilson 

Alwin Phillips E. J. McCoy Max Preslar 

Ben Laney Julius abernethy Troy Barger 

Robert Hawn Frank Deitz Carl Robinson 

John Whitener David Gosnald armon Deal 

Harold Keever auburn Poovey Paul Bumbarger 

Charles Kanupp James Garrett 

For the first time in its history, Hickory High School has had a Monogram Club included 
among its many activities. 

The club was started at a banquet given the football lettermen during the latter part of 
December. The first meeting was held early in January, at which time baseball, basketball, and 
tennis monogram wearers were admitted. 

Led by their two advisors, Coach Scarborough and Mr. Cottrell, the members have striven 
to join the bonds between athletics and school work more closely. One of the requirements 
for membership is that the lctterman maintains a passing grade in at least three subjects; in that 
way the age-old theory that an athlete isn't noted for his "brain-work" is abolished. Another 
aim of the Club is to prevent the wearing of a monogram by a non-member. 

The Monogram Club is to be continued throughout each year, with the hope that it will 
create a better athletic relationship between Hickory High and her opponents, and encourage 
school spirit and good sportsmanship among the students. 



Page Seventy-two 



HICKORY LOG 




GIRLS' MONOGRAM CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Jean Williams President 

Mary Leonard , Vice-President 

NlNA HALL Secretary -Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Mary Hall Mary Leonard 

Nina Hall Martha Thornbrough 

Agnes Icard Gladys Whitener 

Nihla Lail Joan Whitener 

Jean Williams 



Page Seventy -three 



HICKORY LOG 




BARNES 

-_.A ^ BiriGHAm BREUDER. 

HAiun 

TB1TZ 

- — ^ ^-— ^ \ riuk. fl 

_!•■■ ' / 

• •»■ £ , i B 1 IHHITENER _ 

UJH1TEXER ■Hb^^H %/ ' 'J-HtSOn 

*^»l TFETEP, mORSTl'' 
\ I / 

HARRIS W Kr ^I^Br 

JODES ^^B : "' '5?: ™ KAnUPP 

OFFICERS 

FRANCES WHITENER ... - President 

HELEN TEETER Vice-President 

H. D. MORETZ Secretary-Treasurer 

Page Seventy-four 



a 



mini 






D 



(D 



ATHLETICS 



COACHES 



Coach Scarborough 

Football 

Boys Basketball 

Baseball 



Coach Walling 

Girls Basketball 




7& 



HICKORY LOG 




* ?n ?! 16 ' . 3 4 8 



Nkj^ 



^HW^^^'V^ 



■ 



■ 



Football Squad 



FOOTBALL 1935 



I. SHELBY, Sept. 27— The fighting Tornadoes, inspired by a new coach, opened the season with 
a crushing victory over Shelby, 32-0. The whole team displayed superior skill in all parts of the game, 
scoring in each of the last three quarters. Captain Beck collected two of the touchdowns. Teeter Taced 
80 yrads for six points, Beck passed to Abernethy for another score, and John Cline, a brilliant substitute, 
intercepted a pass and side-stepped thirty yards for the last tally. Two extra points were gained on passes — - 
Beck to Kanupp, and Laney to Cordell. 

II. STATES VILLE, Oct. 4.— After marching down the field on three plays to score an easy touch- 
down in the first quarter, the Tornadoes fought on even terms for three remaining periods to lose to their arch 
rival, Statesville, 7-6, Kanupp scored Hickory's only touchdown on a pass from Phillips. 



III. BELMOXT, Oct. 
12-6 on a rough, dusty field. 



11 — Trading at the half 6-0, Hickory staged a fiery comeback to defeat Belmont 
Beck and Teeter made the tallies. 



IV. LINCOLNTON — Hickory High crushed Lincoln ton beneath the score of 25-0, scoring in every 
period but the third. The highlight of the game was Deitz's 70-yard run after intercepting a pass. Phillips, 
Beck, Deitz, Garrett, Kanupp, and J. Abee were mainstays for the Tornadoes. 

V. CONCORD — A scrapping crew of Tornadoes bowed before the powerful attack of a heavier, tricky 
Concord eleven, 20-0. A couple of triple reverse passes, a line of fierce blockers, and a breath-taking 50-yard 
dash by Bratton spelled doom. It was no "walk-away" however, Beck. Teeter, Garrett, Kanupp, and Deitz 
coming through with outstanding defense work. Concord made 12 first downs, Hickory, 5. 

VI. LEXINGTON'. Now 1. -Handicapped by the loss of Teeter because of illness, Hickory lost to a 
strong Lexington team, 13-6. The Tornadoes score came in the fourth, Phillips passing 15 yards to Kanupp 
who ran 5 yards, to cross the marker standing up. Corn and Johnston starred for the visitors, with Beck, 
Phillips, Kanupp, Abee, Garrett, Deitz and Heavener showing up well for the home team. 

VII. NEWTON — After battling on even terms for almost four quarters in the best game of the season, 
Hickory began a march for the goal line, when Garrett blocked a punt in midfield. Stopped on the three- 
yard stripe, the ball went over. Morrison. Newton, attempted to punt from behind his goal line, fumbled 
as the whistle blew, and the game was Hickory's by virtue of an automatic safety. Phillips suffered a broken 
collar bone in the second quarter but substitute John Cline, filled the breach and turned in some nice block- 
ing. The while Hickory team went on a starring spree and Gurley, Coley, and Morrison shone for Newton. 

VIII. BARIL'M SPRINGS — Playing slow, mediocre football, Hickory allowed a heads-up orphanage 
team to run riot for four touchdowns and keep them out of the scoring column. Score, 26-0. Beck's punt- 
ing was outstanding and Garrett, Teeter, Deitz, and Abee played well. Dave and Ralph Spenser were the 
big guns in the Barium attack. 

IX. KANXAPOLI S —Hickory trounced Kannapolis 13-6, making eleven first downs to the opponent's 
six. In the second quarter Beck passed 20 yards to Kanupp behind the goal line for the first touchdown, 
and then dived across himself in the third quarter to put the game in the bag. The Tornado eleven finished 
the year in a blaze of glory, exhibiting a smooth-running attack. Payne and Creighton starred for Kannapolis. 



Page Seventy-seven 



n 




JACK BECK, 165 Pounds 
Halfback or Fullback 
Captain Beck, fleer-footed, shifty, triple-threat man. 
sang his swan song this season. He proved to be a cap- 
able leader, deceptive back, and consistent ground-gainer. 

CHARLES KANUPP. 165 Pounds 

End 

Playing his last year of high school football. Kanupp 

turned in a brilliant season marked by hard tackling, nice 

runs, and apt receiving of passes. This towhead will be 

missed. 

FRANK DeitZ. 175 Pounds 
Center 
Deitz was outstanding in every game played, making 
spectacular tackles, intercepting passes, and working at 
center with exceptional skill. Receiving a berth on one 
of the All-Conference elevens, he was commended by all 
the coaches played against. Deitz will "go places" for 
the college of his choice. 

JOHN CLINE. 158 Pounds 
Halfback, Center 
Although "labeled" the first-string center substitute, 
reliable, hard hitting, and promising, John proved his 
versatility by shifting to the backfield and stepping into 
the injured Phillip's shoes — running, passing, and block- 
ing like a veteran for the remmainder of the season. 

LUKE HEAVNER. 190 Pounds 
Tackle 



"gave opponents fits" 
"hole opening" abilitv. 



160 Pounds 



Tall, broad-shouldered Luke 
with his slashing tackles, effective 
and steady nerve. 

John Whitener, 

End 

Steady, dependable, and hard -fighting sums up John 
on the football field. He should prove quite an asset 
next year in the line. 

J. D. THOMASON, 170 Pounds 
Guard 

J. D.. especially outstanding on defense, was a hard 
tackier, breaking through to nail the ball carrier before 
he could start. This big husky should shine next season. 

JACK ABEE. 170 Pounds 
Guard 

Exerting a settling influence on the entire team. Jack 
plugged away making spectacular runs possible and "nip- 
ping in the bud" dangerous plays by opponents. Though 
quiet and unassuming, on the field his fighting spirit can- 
not be downed. 

RUSS ABEE. 155 Pounds 

Halfback 

This tall, lanky back proved his ability "to take it" 

and "to dish it out" in every contest, side-stepping 

tackles, diving through the line, and expertly receiving 

passes. 

Clyde Jones. 155 Pounds 

Guard 
Climaxing his football experience at Newton. Clyde 
turned in some brilliant work, especially as stationary 
guard. 

JACK CORDELL. 150 Pounds 
End 
Cordell utilized his height advantageously and de- 
veloped into a better than average "snagger" of passes. 
He ably went into the line as a relief Tornado. 



Coach Scarborough 

Coach Scarborough became the "Miracle Man" of the 
year by "pulling out of rhe bag" of green material a 
smoothing-running. skillful team of fighters — convincing 
proof of his amazing coaching ability. 



JAMES GARRETT. 190 Pounds 
Tackle 

A bulwark of strength on defense, a battering ram 
on offense — thus, might this calm, determined tackle 
be described. His educated toe chalked up many extra 
points while his kickoff gave the enemy something to 
look for. For stiff. 60 minutes per hour competition we 
recommend James. 



Mac Teeter. 135 Pounds 

Quarterback 

A clever field general, elusive runner, and able safety 
man Mac, light in weight played every game with a world 
of fire and pluck. 



Alwyn Phillips. 155 Pounds 

Halfback 

Making the varsity for the first time. Phillips became 
a skillful passer and a good blocker. His season was 
cut short at Newron by a broken collar-bone. 



HAROLD KEEVER. 145 Pounds 
End 

Although new at the game. Kcever displayed excep- 
tional ability in tackling and blocking. One of next 
year's end positions is well taken care of in this plucky, 
determined lad. 



ROBERT HAHN. 145 Pounds 
Back 

Robert has the burning desire to be a good athlete and 
the "stick-to-it-iveness" quality that will make him 
succeed. 



BEN LANEY. HO Pounds 
Halfback 

Ben gained recognition as a broken field runn;r of no 
little prowess. His general all round ability developed 
during the season predicts future stardom. 



JULIUS ABERNETHY. 140 Pounds 
Halfback 

This hard fighter will have another year to defend 
Hickory High. His determination and all-round good 
work will mean much to the Tornadoes. 



E. J. MCCOY. 1 65 Pounds 
Guard 

Clearing the way for Tornado ball carriers was E. J.'s 
specialty. 

Merle Houck 

Being Manager for two years successfully is quite an 
accomplishment and Merle deserves all the praise possible. 
He has been dependable, accommodating, and prompt. 

Russell Smith 

i 

Russel "learned the ropes" early in the season and 
Y performed the tasks cheerfully and well. 











BOYS' BASKETBALL 




Luther Heavener 
'36 Captain and Center 

A hard worker. Luke was agressive and a good scrapper. 

"Russ" ABEE 
Alternate Captain and Forward 

Alternate Captain. All Conference forward and leading 
scorer was "Russ's" reward for his splendid work. 



Robert Hahn 
Lanky Forward 

He made a regular berth his first year on the squad. 



Jack Abee 

"Long-shot Guard" 

Noted for his defensive play. Though hampered by 
illness he made a good account of himself during the 
season. 



Jack Beck 
Coolest Guard 

The most consistent man on the squad. Though not 
very tall, he was rated as one of the best guards in the 
Conference. 



Charles Kanupp 
Forward 

Alternated at forward, he was always a good scrapper. 



Miller Sigmon 

Rugged Center 

Slim was reserve center. Although just a freshman to 
the squad, he proved worthy support to Luke. 



BOYS' BASKETBALL 



Ned Frye 
Reserve Guard 

Because of his consistency, Ned is likely to fill Beck's 
shoes. 

Ben Laney 
Chubby Forward 

Though very diminutive. Ben is fast and is perhaps 
the hardest worker on the squad. 



Bayne Teague 
Forward 

The only "Soph" on the squad will be well prepared 
for the next two years. 



Franklin Carver 

Forward 

His willingness and agressiveness this year has helped 
him to earn a monogram. 



Frank Deitz 
"Chubby" Guard 

Frank played reserve guard and seems to be the most 
likely man to replace Jack Abee. 

Armon Deal 
Forward 

Although not able to stay out all year, he is a letter- 
man from last year. 



Elmer Hollar 
"Tubby" Manager 

Although hard to find in dressing room he stays the 
'time." 




I) 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Jean Williams 
Captain 

Letterman for three years. All Conference two years. 
Captain and high scorer this season. Tall sure-shooting, 
dread of her opponents will surely be missed next year. 



Mary Leonard 
Alternate Captain 

Alternate Captain this season. Our tall center guard 
who did plenty of qood playing for two years. She'll 
be missed in "5 7, all right. 

Nina Hall 
Guard 

All Conference star player. Quick as a flash. "Sis" 
did some fine work all four years. We couldnt have 
done without her. 



Agnes Icard 
Forward 

"Ickie" played two years of swell basketball. She 
certainly gave her guard "the run-around." And you 
could always depend on her for lots of score. 

Joan Whitener 
Forward 

Conscientious describes her work. "Jone" was a fast 
player and she could surely shoot those goals from the 
front. We depended on her good work for two years. 

Mary Hall 
Guard 

Only a sophomore but plays like a professional. We 
predict that she will be an All Conference her next two 
years. 

Imogene Cashion 
Guard 

She's played two years and has another, thank good- 
ness! "Imo" works hard and deserves lots of credit for 
her good playing. 



NlHLA LAIL 
Forward 



A forward for three years. We all depended on 
good aim in shooting those balls in the basket. 



her 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Gladys Whitener 

Forward 

Another forward who showed what height could do 
toward ringing many a goal. She was on the team two 
years. 



Nell Moser 
Guard 

We're glad Nell will be here another year for she sticks 
with her forward like a magnet does to iron. 

Maude Shuford 
Guard 

Are those Siamese twins? No. just Maude stickin' to 
her forward. She has played one year and has another. 



Gtha Rice 

Forward 

A tall forward who has played two years and if she 
improves as much next year as she did this she'll be a 
star player. 

Mildred Shuford 
Forward 

She certainly has a good aim for the basket. 



Peggy Cannon 
Guard 

This is her first year playing for Hickory High. She 
showed how practice and hard work make a real good 
player. We'll have her next year. 

Hazel Whitener 

Forward 

She shows us that you don't have to be tall to get 
around and shoot the ball. This is her first year but 
she has two more. 



Martha Thornbrough 
Manager 

Our faithful score keeper and "cleaner-upper." She 
did lots of hard work two years that many people didn't 
know about. 



(' 




?5 



HICKORY LOG 



Hickory . 

Hickory . 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory . 

Hickory 

Hickory . 

Hickory . 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory 

Hickory . 

Hickory 



BASKETBALL SCORES 

Boys Girls Boys Girls 

33 41 Mooresville 27 17 — Hickory 

16 21 Kannapolis 3 3 13 — Kannapolis 

49 40 Barium Springs .35 33 — Barium Springs 

45 43 Morganton 15 20 — Morganton 

28 67 Lincolnton 29 4 — Hickory 

37 54 Kannapolis 21 20 — Hickory 

47 52 Lenoir 25 26 — Lenoir 

19 3 3 Newton 12 8— Hickory 

.17 23 Statesville 13 27 — Statesville 

44 45 Lenoir 30 1 7 — Hickory 

52 43 Barium Springs .37 24 — Hickory 

49 40 Statesville 29 27 — Hickory 

24 37 Mooresville ...34 18 — Mooresville 

30 .48 Lincolnton 25 12 — Lincolnton 

27 33 Newton 12 6 — Newton 

38 40 Morganton 16 21 — Hickory 



SCHOOL SONG 

Hail! All hail to Hickory High School, 

And to her colors true. 

We will ever more be loyal. 

For we're proud of you. 

And we'll sing a song of gladness. 

Name thy glories o'er, 

Hail! All hail to Hickory High School. 

For ever more. 

Chorus 

Then wave her colors ever. 

Furl her standard never, 

Raise it high and proudly cry, 

"We're Hickory High School girls and boys forever.'' 

Our songs and praises swell, 

Let's all join hands and give a yell. 

For we'll fight with a vim that is dead sure to win. 

For old Hickory High! 

Lift the chorus, speed it onward. 

Loud thy praises sing. 

As thy noble sons and daughters 

Make the welkin ring. 

Arm in arm we'll stand together. 

Thy honor we'll uphold. 

Hail! All hail to Hickory High School 

And the Garner and Gold. 



Page Eighty-four 






HICKORY LOG 




TENNIS 



One of the most successful seasons ever enjoyed by Hickory tennis teams 
was the record of the 1935 squad, which won eight matches and lost two. 
Among the teams beaten were Charlotte and Concord, the latter by very decisive 
scores. 

Graduation made a serious impression in the Red Tornadoes' hopes for a 
better record this spring, Bill Kennedy, Jack Mauney, Charles Morrison, and 
Jimmy Williams having finished their high school career last year. The 1936 
team will probably be built around Captain David Gosnold and Auburn 
Poovey, last year's only remaining regulars; and Paul Bumbarger, Marshall 
Mauney. and John Friday, substitutes in 1935. 



Last year's results: 

Hickory 4 

Hickory 9 

Hickory ... 4 

Hickory 4 

Hickory 8 

Hickory 7 

Hickory 2 

Hickory 3 

Hickory 8 

Hickory 9 



Charlotte 5 

China Grove 

Charlotte 3 

Lenoir 1 

Morganton 1 

China Grove 

Lenoir 3 

Morganton 

Concord 2 

Concord 1 



Page Eighty-five 



HICKORY LOG 




T*~ . >-^ 



BASEBALL 

After a lapse of several years Hickory High decided by popular acclamation 
to sponsor baseball as major sports activity in the spring of '35. Although we 
had no regular athletic coach, our principal, Mr. Cottrell (V. P. I.) kindly 
consented to tutor those with aspirations of becoming big leaguers. Even 
though the boys were, for the most part, "out of practice" our Coach worked 
up a fine team in a short time. Handicapped as we were, we not only developed 
a spirit of team work and sportsmanship, but we were a winning team as well. 
Remembering the corking good times we had (and the supper at Lincolnton 
on our Coach), we are looking forward to next season with high hopes and 
aims. 



Page Eighty-six 




IL 
(D 



SNAPSHOTS 




News. news, special edition! . . . 
You don't really think so — if you do 
speak up . . . The music may "go round 
and round" but we stay here . . . Watch 
the Stop and Go sign please . . . once 
upon a time there were three princesses 
. . . Dtoided attention . . . "nor iron bars 
a cage" . . . "Stay as sweet as you are" 
. . . A perpetual smile . . . "We like to 
take orders from you" . . . At last the 
voices are still . . . I'll chastise thee . . . 
"Waiting at the gate is Maggie." 



"Just three more months and ten 
more days" . . . Crooner, professor, sci- 
entist, journalist and guess who? . . . 
Stop, look and listen! . . . The depend - 
ables if you please, not the "untouch- 
ables" . . . And life is worth living at 
Hickory High . . . "Cyclists" may come 
and cyclists may go ... A flow of wit- 
in triple- time . . . In the good old 
lunching hour. 





Delicious and refreshing . . . Every- 
body's trucking . . . Doicn in front! 
. . . It must be a funny game . . . We 
got rhythm . . . Easy on the eye . . . 
A little bit independent in your smile 
. . . The cold shoulder . . . The game's 
in front of you! . . . What's so inter- 
esting . . . Wonder that's happening' 



n QtRT \M£i MEMOHIW. LIBRAE 




60984"81800 l 



Wonder what's in the center? . . . 
Hope they don't break the camera . . . 
What's so attractive about Fire Chief's 
car . . . Our gang . . . I've got trouble — 
double trouble . . . Popularity in gen- 
eral . . . Whatcha doin '? . . . Well? 






Hold that line ... 1,1 now put your 
hands on your hips . . . All set, ready 
. . . Co . . . Those Bench Warmers . . . 



The lone soldier 
Frog next time . 
Going my way.' . 
way, a game? . . 
waiting for? . . 
what's this? 



. . Let's play Leap 
. .See my muscle . . . 

. What is this any- 
Well, what are you 

If three's a crowd 



Oh boy, look at that scenery . . . Just 
a little tight-rope walker . . . Age of 
innocence . . . It's the old hang-out . . . 
Don't let go . . . Peek-a-boo . . . "Sugar 
is sweet and so are you" . . . So tired 
(of doing nothing) . 





They're not grazing — or are they? 
. . . Hurry, it's nearly time for the bell. 
. . . They look a little "fetched." . . . 
Why so sad? . . . The little red school- 
house . . . Feet and more feet . . . "Old 
Faithful" . . . Just around the corner, 
ivaiting for — . . . Aw. you don't mean 
it . . . Just we two . . . She's on the 
job . . . The gossip corner . . . I hope 
she worked the geometry right . . . And 
have you heard about — . . . Does she 
have another leg? . . . May I have your 
telephone number? . . . Keep that school- 
girl complexion. 



Left Column: 

Senior Mascot . . . Where's 
you dignity . . . The handsome 
hero of many dramatic produc- 
tions . . . Al(vin) and Al- 
(onzo) , two of the grads of 
'36 . . .A perfect pair . . . The 
trio that typifies studiousness 
... (Oh yeah) . . . All classes 
turn attention to the May Day 
pageant and. temporarily, all 
forget the cares of school life 
and take part in the fun and 
frolic typical of fairies and elves, 
paying homage to the May 
Queen and all the other things 
that mean a real May Day 
festival. 



Right Column: 
Masters of Muddy Roads — 
the three faithful Bus drivers 

■ . . Service with a smile and a 
Southern accent . . . Personi- 
fied Pep . . . Here are our De- 
mosthenes. Ciceros. Platos. Pat- 
rick Henry, and Huey Longs . . . 
But they tell us that it's sing- 
ing .. . "Artistic, original, de- 
pendable Betty." . . . And may 
we tell you of the powers of 
the Supreme Court of the U. 
S.? . . . "Official Keeper-Offers" 

■ ■ ■ Won't dance — don't ask 
us . . . Girls, here's your chance 
at some handsome cops . . . 



1/ 





Left Column: 

On the Milky Way . . . The 
daring young man . . . "Heap 
much big strong man" . . . How 
do you like modeling? . . . Hold 
everything . . . "The Thinker" 
. . . Lunch time Laziness . . . 
Mary, where' s your little lamb? 
. . . "On the Chain Gang" . . . 
Headless so naturally brainless 
. . . Is that elephant's head 
Downie, Brother? . . . There's 
always hope ... A natural pose 
. . . The ghost of the night. 



Right Column: 
On the breast of the new- 
fallen snow . . . Watch them 
fall . . . Don't slip. Bill, you're 
sure to fall . . . Peggy and Mar- 
garet facing snow balls . . . 
Hickory Hi under snowy cover 
. . . Is that Josephine? — too 
much snow balling ... A uni- 
versal winter sport . . . How we 
shiver at such views . . . "The 
Snow had begun in the gloom- 
ing" . . . All bundled up for 
the North Pole . . . "And every 
twig is covered with ermine." 



Left Column: 

On this page you see 

Our august faculty 

Dignity, learning, and wisdom 

portrayed 
Whether bachelor or old maid 
Some are short, and some are tall 
But regardless we like them all 
Algebra, geometry. Latin. 

Shakespeare 
For all of these we've never shed 

a tear 
But you work away both night 

and day 
And pass us — just to get us 

away. 
Our best regards to all of you 
Appreciation for your kindness 

too. 



Right Column: 
The Bamboo Princess 

One of the most colorful 
entertainments ever staged at 
Hickory High was the Japanese 
Operetta. "The Bamboo Prin- 
cess," given by the Glee Club 
under the direction of Mrs. Vena 
Little Goode. Leading parts 
were played by Eve Tomlinson. 
Hendley Ellington. H. D. Mo- 
retz. Connolly Gamble, Weston 
Hatfield, Elizabeth Pruitt. Eos- 
teena Varner, Ruth Yount. Jul- 
ius Abernethy, and others. 





Popularity 
and 

Friendliness 

Neatness! 
Wit! 

Athletics! 
Studiousness! 

Attractiveness 
and 

Beauty! 



a 



~?ir~? 



£1 




SI 

2 



(D 






ADVERTISEMENTS 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

In conclusion may we thank all who have so gener- 
ously and willingly helped in the publication of this 
book. To all our advertisers we express our appre- 
ciation not only for your generous aid but for your 
courteous treatment of us at all times. To Mr. Cottrell 
and the faculty we would say that without your help 
and direction our efforts could not have availed much. 
And too we thank all seniors for all have been entirely 
willing to perform any tasks assigned them. Especially 
are we indebted to Betty Bowles, Harry Steelman, 
Edith Pope, Mary Legh Geitner, Joan Whitener, Max 
Hammond, and others for their very definite and valu- 
able help. We thank Hardin's Studio and all our 
friends for their interest and aid in publishing this 
Hickory Log of 193 6. 



Honey's 
Honey Dew 

It's Delicious 

10th Ave., Near 

LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE 



College Service 
Shoppe 

Hickory. N. C. 



*_ „_.._„_ . 



f " " , . ' " "j 

Mr. Cottrell s idea of a waste of time J 

! is a school-boy painting the town red | 

when he should be brushing up on his j 

studies. | 



MlSS GREEVER — If you added 76,- 
397 to 81,412, what would you get? I 
Garrison — A wrong 



Erskine 
answer. 



I 



Charles Henry — You know, last 
year the doctor told me that if I didn't 
stop smoking I'd be feeble-minded. 

Herb. Robinson — Why didn't you 
stop? 



Mrs. Winkler — Do you think that 
the radio will ever take the place of the 
newspaper? 

Russ SMITH — Naw. you can't swat 
flies with the radio. 






EXPERT LANDSCAPE 
SERVICE 

Quality Plants at 
Reasonable Cost 

The Howard-Hickory Go. 

Hickory. N. C. 



Love is blonde. 
+ „ 



+._., — 



Max Hammond — This show we 



are going to see is the best mystery J 
thriller in town. , 

Iris Abernethy — My, I'll bet we'll 
be on the edge of our seats all night. 

Max Hammond — You bet. We're 
sitting in the balcony. 



Charles Kanupp — Gosh, Miss 
Shuford sure has a changeable temper, 
hasn't she? 

Ernestine Kingsolver — Yes, 

sometimes it's bad and sometimes it's 
worse. 



JACK BECK — Even when I work at 
top speed, my work is piling up all the 
time. 

Dorothy Buchanan — I thought 
you played football. 

I Jack Beck — I do. My work is pil- 
I ing up the other team. 



NlNA HALL — I certainly wish na- , 
ture had blessed me with hair the color 
of yours. 

JlMMIE LOHR — Well, I wish nature 
had blessed me with it, too; dearie. 



"" "" "" uu "" mi— »■—■«{# 



+ 



. + 



Page One Hundred One 



+ *■ 

! I 



Better Homes 
Furnishing Co. 



Complete 

Home 
Furnishers 



Compliments of 

Jones & Jones Furniture 
Company 

"Everything for the Home" 



+ 



PHONE 749 
Hickory. N. C. 



Compliments of 

Doctors 
Campbell, Yount, Fritz 

DENTISTS 

I Office in Menzies Bldg. — Phone 370 
I 



+ , 



"" "" "" IB in Rljl lf»"BII— OS— ■■ .im— ii ; «ii «ii 

+ A, 






Permanent Waves of Distinction 

COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE 
PERSONALITY HAIR CUTTING 

DOROTHY'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

DOROTHY MlLLIKEN. Proprietor 



\ 



Compliments of 

James Wholesale 
Grocery Co. 

1228 Hth Street 
PHONE 3 3 9- J 



+- 

+■ 



.+ + 



congratulations 
The Flowers Seating Co. 

Hickory. N. C. 



Compliments 

BUSBY MOTOR CO. 

STUDEBAKER— PACKARD 

Sales Service 



__ W" •li_ B ». ^^ _ L U| _, „ n ,J ( 



Page One Hundred Tivo 



McNeil School of Beauty 
Culture 

State Accredited 

14th Street Cline Bldg. 

Telephone 826-J 



-+ 

I 



Complete Course Taught 



+ .._.. 



-+ 



Best Wishes 

HICKORY 
HOSIERY MILL 

Hickory. N. C. 



.. „ — + 






We Specialize in 

Smart Clothes 

MODERATELY PRICED 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL MEN 



West-Deal Co. 

"The Quality Shop" 



IDEAL FOOD MARKET 

"Famous for Famous Foods" 

CHOICE MEATS AND QUALITY 
GROCERIES 

Strictly Independent 



+ 



+ ._. ._.. 



noun iijl 






EDD'S MOTOR 
SUPPLY 

Dealers m 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
AND TRIMMINGS 






'When It's Done by Buff — That's 
Said Enough" 

BUFF SHOE SHOP 

AND 

SHINE PARLOR 

—UNION SQUARE— 

Hickory, N. C 

"Our leather is as hard to beat as Hickory 
High's Team.'' 



+- 



I I 

I I 

J I 

I I 



PARAMOUNT 
THEATRE 

'The Friendly Theatre" 

Oilers 

BEST PICTURES 

AT LOW PRICES 

BEST stage shows 

Properly Presented 



._,. ,_. + + 



Page One Hundred Three 



a,., i,„ im „„ 



Hickory Chair Manufacturing Company 

Manufacturers 



K. C. MENZIES, President 



A. B. HUTTON, Vice-President 



GEORGE BAILEY, Secretary and Treasurer 



Hickory. N. C. 






— + 



Shuford 
Hardware Co. 

OLDEST— LARGEST— BEST 

Complete Lines 

Sporting Goods 

Chinaware Silverware 

Enamelware 

Cole's Stoves and Circulator 

Copper Clad Ranges 

Paints, Varnishes, etc. 

Roofing and Building Materials 

"Frigidaires" 



— , — + 

+ 



A Bank Account 

Helps to Balance the 

Family Budget 



Successful home financing calls for a 
cash reserve for special needs and emerg- 
encies. Systematic saving should be a 
feature of your budget. This bank of- 
fers a safe, convenient depository, with 
the advantage of regular interest on 
your reserve funds. 



First National Bank 

HICKORY, N. C 

Capital, Surplus, and Profits: 
$700,000.00 



+ 4- , , 

-f .111 



Page One Hundred Four 



-+ 

I 




Ready Kilowatt says . 

Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to the 
Class of 1936 



Reddy Kilowatt is the symbol of your elec- 
tric service! Make him a part of your plan 
for living. You will find you spend less and 
enjoy life more. 



CITY COAL CO. 

"The Home of Better Coals" 

Phone 900 
Hickory. N. C. 



DUKE POWER CO. 



i 



-+ 

i 

i 






Sherrill Ice & Fuel 
Company 

Pure Deep Well Water Ice and 
High Grade Coal 

Phone 721 

W. N. SHERRILL. Manager 



+ ■ 

i 



Compliments to the 
Class of 1936 



•■• r 



+- 

4... 



Mrs. Vena Little Goode I 



i 



Piano and Dramatics 
Instructor 



I 

I 
+- 



Esprit D'Amour 
Beauty Shoppe 

Permanent 

Waving 

A Complete Beauty Service 

Menzics Building Phone 737 



Page One Hundred Five 



Taste and Refinement 

Always Displayed in Goods from 

The Bisanar Store 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES, 

JEWELRY, RINGS, 

CLASS PINS, etc. 



Geo. E. Bisanar 

Jewelry and Optometrist 
Hickory, N. C. 



ju« mi mi nil 



Ask For 

CATAWBA ICE CREAM 

Made from Pure Sweet Cream 

IT HAS THE FLAVOR 

Catawba Creamery Co. 

Hickory, N. C. 



+- 

+- 



-+ 

I 
I 



Paramount Motor Sales, 
Incorporated 

OLDSMOBILE 
CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH 

Sales- — Service 



-+ 

i 



i 



*"■ 

I 



I I 



AMOCO 

Gasoline 
Oils 



Distributed 
By 

Blackwelder Oil 
Company 



Compliments of 

Electrical Service Co. 

HICKORY. N. C. 
"Quality that Counts" 

Day and Night Service 
PHONES 






I 



Day 271 -J 



Night 730-J 



Visit Our New Store 
Everything in 

NEW and USED FURNITURE 

Brown & White 
Furniture Co. 

Opposite Fire Department 

1017 14th Street Phone 396-L 



-+ 

i 

i 



*j»_ M1 m w 



Page One Hundred Six 



, „ n „„_ . ,*.„ nn 



Give Flowers for Graduation 

Whatever You Have to Say — 
Say It With Flowers 




Meet Me at 

KEEVER'S 
KAFE 

Phone 286-J 
Hickory. N. C. 



+- 



Brooks M. Todd 
Floral Co. 

Hotel Hickory Building 
Phone 454 



+ — . 



i 

I 
■+ 

-+ 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 1936 

Your Home Should 
Come First 

Yount Furniture Go. 

Phone 21 Hickory. N. C. 



I 
+- 






-+ 



Compliments of 

Economy 
Auto Supply 

1220 Ninth Ave. 



With Compliments of Your 
Local Gas Company 

PIEDMONT GAS 
COMPANY 

Hickory. N. C. 
hotel hickory building 



GOODRICH TIRES. TUBES. 

BATTERIES. RADIOS and 

ACCESSORIES 



*— 

I 
I 
I 

I 



+ , 



Home Appliance Gift Go. 

"The Home of 

GENERAL @ ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 
GIFT SHOP 

Telephone 757 -J Hotel Hickory Bldg. 



-+ 

I 



..+ +- ■ 



. + 



Page One Hundred Seven 



-+ *•• 



Blue Ridge Products 
Company 



Compliments of 



Carolina Oil Co. 



— EAT- 



Blue Ridge Ice Cream 



Sold At The Best Places 
Phone 771 



Distributors 

of 



SHELL PRODUCTS 

Hickory. N. C. 



+.— .. 



I 
-.* +- 



Doctors 
D. B. Rollins L. G. Rollins 

CHIROPRACTORS 

COMPLETE X-RAY SERVICE 

1219 11th Avenue Hickory, N. C. 

Phone 74 6 



I 



Compliments of 



HOTEL HICKORY 



Hickory. N. C. 



-+ 
| 

i 
I 



i 






. -+ +.. 



Paints and Wallpaper 
Artists Supplies 

Miller Paint & Wallpaper 
Store 



1226 Ninth Ave. 



Phone 895 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1936 

AND TO 

THE RED TORNADOES 

W. O. Corey 

HICKORY. N. C. 



+ 






Page One Hundred Eight 



Compliments of 

Hickory Drug Store 

The Rexall Store 

Phone 46 

Cash Cut Rate 

Hickory. N. C. 



-+ 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



+._„„- 



Compliments of 



W. T. Grant & Go. 



Hickory, N. C. 



+- 
+- 






m— mi^— mi— — un^— iitf* 



-+ 

I 



f— » 



Compliments of 

The Flowers Go. 



1121 Ninth Ave. 



Phone 64 j I 

I I 

I I 

I | 



CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 1936 

Zerden's Dept. Store 

Outfitters for the Entire Family 
Hickory, N. C. 



-+ 

i 



meet your friends at 
Henkil's Place 

Good Cold Beer on Draught 
1026 13th Street 
Hickory, N. C. 



I 

i 

-+ 



1 
I 

1 CONGRATULATIONS 


TO THE CLASS OF 1936 


W. R. Hatfield 


Hickory. N. C. 
1 


1 

+ „ . _j, 



..-+ 



A Treat for You 
TAR HEEL BREAD 



Waldensian Bakery 

Hickory. N. C. 



Compliments of 

Huffry Service Station 
No. 2 

PURE OIL PEP 

Clarence Norman. Manager 



\ I 
4 +- 



4 



Page One Hundred Nine 



-+ £.- 



Belk-Broome 
Company 



Hickory's Big 
Department Store 



MAKE OUR STORE 
YOUR SHOPPING 
HEADQUARTERS 



AMERICAN 

SERVICE 

CO. 



Ice and Goal 



J No Long Waits When You Order — 
No Short Weights When We Deliver 



Phone 261 
HICKORY, N. C. 



I 

.4 



i 
+- 






BUMBARGER'S 

Is a Good Book Store in a Good Town 
And It's You That Has Helped to Make It So 




TELEPHONE 48 



HICKORY, N. C. 



„. + 



+ — . 



Page One Hundred Ten 



HUTTON-BOURBONNAIS 
COMPANY 

Rough and Dressed 
White and North Carolina Pine 



OAK 



POPULAR 
Box Shooks a Specialty 



CHESTNUT 



+ 






CLAY 
PRINTING 
COMPANY 



Printers 

Lithographers 

Designers 



Phone 167 
HICKORY. N. C. 



Hickory 
Amusement Go. 

— Operating — 

NEW CAROLINA 

RIVOLI PASTIME 

GRAND 

Theatres 

We Show the Best Pictures Produced 

Your Patronage Solicited 

Special Prices to Students 



Westen 

SOUND 




tectrk 



I VOICE I 

i «?U ia SYSTEM 



.+ + 



Page One Hundred Eleven 



f" 



-+ *.■ 



DRINK 

NEHI 

Fruit Orange 

Ask Your- Doctor 



Orange Crush 
Bottling Co. 



Phone 44 



Hickory, N. C. 



i 
i 1 
I I 



DRINK 

ORANGE CRUSH 

"The Fresh Fruit Drink" 



I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 
.„+ +- 



I 



I ! 






CARNATION 

and 
EVER-READY FLOUR 

Is the Best by Every Test 

Be Sure and Call for It 
"A Hickory Product" 



Hickory Flour 
Mill 

Hickory, N. C. 



Hickory 
Paper Box Co. 

INCORPORATED 



Manufacturers of 

SET UP PAPER BOXES 

OF ALL KINDS 



Hickory, N. C 



-+ 

i 



-+ 



i 
-* 



Page One Hundred Twelve 



"" "-•{• •!•" «"""■ nil— mi 



HOTEL SODA SHOP 

DRINKS 

CANDY 

ICE CREAM 

MAGAZINES 

Hotel Hickory Building 



— -* 



CONGRATULATIONS 

To The 

CLASS OF 1936 

Richard Hefner 

HICKORY, N. C. 



f — , — 



4. + 

-* *■— ■< — 



Economy Drug Go. 

"On the Minute Service" 

PRESCRIPTION FIRST 

Phone 26 

— We Deliver — 



G. E. Gwin 

Personal Insurance Service 

Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of California 

205 Grant Building 
HICKORY, N. C 






I 
.,4. 



Hickory's Leading Apparel Store 

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS 

GRADUATING GLASS OF 1936 

READY-TO-WEAR 

MILLINERY 



SHOES 



HOSIERY 



ACCESSORIES 



SPAINHOUR'S 



Page One Hundred Thirteen 



—•——■» — + 



Compliments of 

Ivev Weavers, Inc. 

J 7 

Hickory. N. C. 



*■— 



••* 



m, 1,1. mi — mi— ,, II— mi— mi— mi— _iiii-«|* *$..- 



* 


The Wilfong 


Florist 




Mrs. Bryan Wilfong 




Flowers for Every 


Occasion 


' Corner Eighth Avenue and 


Seventeenth Street 




HICKORY, N 


C. 




TELEPHONES 


1 Day 

+ 


220-J 


Night 220-L 
.+ 



I ! 



get your groceries at 
Shirley Grocery Store 

We Have 
Quick Service 



4 + . — 4, 



-+ + 



Compliments 

of 1 


Sinclair Service Station ! 


WASHING GREASING I 
GAS OIL J 


Phone 595-J J 


+ 4. 


Compliments of ; 


Lang Chevrolet Co., Inc. i 


CHEVROLET SALES and SERVICE 


Phone 1 1 7 1 



congratulations 
to the class of 1936 

Service Dry Gleaners 



Ab" Lutz 



Phone 576 



Sinclair Beauty Shop 

We Offer 

A COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE 

Mezzanine Floor — L. Herman's 

PHONE 59 

-t. |m m n Wl MmM „ „ „ n mi ii iu m ■mm Mniiwfi 

+ + 

I HEARTY CONGRATULATIONS 

I 

I TO THE CLASS OF 1936 

I 

Harper Motor Co. 

Ford Sales and Service 



*t* •»•->"< 1 'I I" " UIJ "" u " "" 



Page One Hundred Fourteen 



— * *.- 



Congratulations 
To The Glass of 1936 



Hickory Auto Works, 
Incorporated 



DODGE— PLYMOUTH 

DODGE TRUCKS 

Sales and Service 



+ 



I 

• + 

-+ 
I 



Hotel Service Station 

TEXACO GAS AND OIL 
Phone 33 



+ 



For a Complete Line of 
Drug Store Necessities 

Plus Service 
King's Pharmacy 

— We Deliver — 

Phone 206 Hollar Bldg. 

Hickory, N. C. 



1 The Southern Desk 
Company 



HICKORY, N. C. 






School, Church 

and 

Theatre Furniture 



-+ 



We Feature the Correct Styles 

in Wearing Apparel for 

Young Men 



Young Men's Shop 

UNION SQUARE 



I 
.+ +- 

-+ +.- 
I 
I 



-+ 



Cole's Jewelry Store 

All That is New and Best in 
Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry 

OPEN A CHARGE ACCOUNT 

1 306 Union Square 






I ! 
— + +. 



Page One Hundred Fifteen 



4*n ,.,_.,, 

T" UN^— I'll 



— 4. +. 



LUTZ 
DRUG STORE 

"On the Corner" 



Meet Your Friends 
on the Corner 



Phones: 17 and 317 



TO THE GRADUATING CLASS 

of 

HICKORY HIGH 

CONGRATULATIONS 



To the Lower 

Classmen 
Good Wishes 

• 

Efird's 
Department Store 

"The Store of Better Values" 



nt i. 4..,,,, „„ „,, 



-+ * 



Hardin's Studio 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



Hickory 
Overall Co. 



Portrait and Kodak 
Finishing 



■■* 
-+ 



Manufacturers of 

Overalls 
Shirts Pants 



Telephone 140-J 



Hickory, N. C. 



I I 






Page One Hundred Sixteen 



*■ ■ — 



-+ 

I 



4.U ill! ll.l Ml. 



All That is New and Best in 

Sewing Machines and Vacuum 

Cleaners 

Plus Service 

Singer 
Sewing Machine Go. 



Phone 37 



SERVICE— QUALITY 
The Best in Foods 

GAMBLE'S 

Goods Are Good 



Hickory, N. C. 



+._„ 



+ 



Meats 
Vegetables 



«j._ m , l(l , „,, „ 



Groceries 
Produce 



1350 11th Ave. 



+ 



Fuller Furniture Go. 

QUALITY furniture 
FOR THE HOME 



I ! 



I 1 
I I 
I I 



Hickory 
Steam Laundry 

C. L. DOWNEY. Manager 

DEPENDABLE FOR 3 5 YEARS 

Whatever It My Be — We Wash It Better 



-+ 

i 



1013 14th Street 



+ 

*, 



Phone 485 

, + 



Special 
Linen 
Service 



Banish 
Wash Day 
Here 



PHONE 3 7 






GRACE'S 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Specialists in 

PERMANENT WAVING 

Phone 212 Over Lutz's 



+-„,. 
f— 



„ — + 

* 



I FOUNDRY and MACHINE WORK 



I 



OF ALL KINDS 
Builders of Special Machinery 

Hickory Foundry & 
Machine Go. 

Hickory, N. C. 



BOB 
MARTIN'S 

The Home of 

BOBS LITTLE PIGS 
SAUSAGE 

It Makes Red Gravy 



-+ 

i 
I 



Sells Everything 
GOOD TO EAT 

Meats Fish Game 



■"•J* *r— '" I" "" IIH "" 






Page One Hundred Seventeen 



-+ *■ 



+ 



*._», 



DAY OR NIGHT 
Any Time — 

Any Where 



Ambulance Service 

Phone 264 

♦ 

Hickory 
Funeral Home 



Abernathy Transfer and 
Storage Company 

• • 

MOVING A SPECIALTY 

All Kinds Light and 
Heavy Hauling 

Phones: 



Day 250—147 



Night 1 1 



Hickory. N. C. 



•£_,,„ ,,„ „„ „„ an „„ „„ „„ „„ „„ „„ „„ ,,„ ,,„ „„ |m „,j, •!•_„„ n ,„, |m 



-* 



J. A. CLINE & SON 

Hosiery Manufacturers 

HILDEBRAN. NORTH CAROLINA 



Page One Hundred Eighteen 



"// Pays to Shop at Penny's" 

Penny's Extra Quality Adds 
Nothing to the Price 

Penny's is not in the business for today only. 
We expect to be the favored shopping place of 
your children, their children and their children's 
children. 

That's why Penny's emphasizes Quality as 
the test of "Value." 

That's why Penny's is more determined than 
ever to quote low prices — without sacrifice of 
quality. 

That's why Penny's will be serving the na- 
tion with HONEST VALUES long after 
"price-shooting" competition has disappeared. 

J. G. PENNY CO. 

Hickory. N. C. 



+■• 
I 



— * 



Piedmont and Hickory Farm 
Wagons and Drays 



'Wagons that Satisfy' 



Piedmont Wagon 
& Manufacturing Co. 



Hickory. N. C. 






ELLIOTT KNITTING MILLS 



• • 



Manufacturers of 



High Grade Hosiery 



HICKORY. N. C. 



+ „„._,„ 



Page One Hundred Nineteen 



+ +"• 



HICKORY 

NOVELTY 

CO. 



Manufacturers and Dealers 

Millwork and 
Lumber 

Hickory, N. C. 



DEITZ and TAYLOR 

JEWELRY STORE 



I ! 
I I 



— — — — — tit »t» 



Offers to the Student and 
Family 

SERVICE and QUALITY 

Phone 599 
Hickory. N. C. 



I ! 



BEST WISHES 



George C. Warlick 



Seeds and Feeds 



+ 



I 
I 



congratulations 
to the class of 1936 

Ruth Motor Company 

Hudson — Terraplane 
1125 Ninth Ave. Phone 819 






..+ +- 



Compliments of 

CAROLINA 
STORES 

•:• 

• 

WE APPRECIATE 

YOUR 

PATRONAGE 

. .. .. ..— .+ 



Page One Hundred Twenty 






Drink 




Delicious and Refreshing 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 



— + 



LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE 

(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 

Hickory, North Carolina 

Hickory High School has cooperated in a very fine spirit in the past 
with Lenoir Rhyne College. The College invites a continuance of 
this cooperation. 

Hickory, with her efficient school system, possesses in a high degree 
all of that which goes to make for culture and refinement in Edu- 
cation. 

Lenoir Rhyne College assures you of a continuance of that fine 
cultural atmosphere. 

The College offers courses leading to the degree of A.B. and B.S. 
in Liberal Arts Courses, Teacher Training Courses, and Music 
Courses, and Commercial Courses. 

Let your next step be Lenoir Rhyne College. The 1936-1937 
session will begin September 8, 1936. 

For catalog or other information, address: 

P. E. MONROE, D.D., President 

LENOIR RHYNE COLLEGE 

Hickory. North Carolina 



+_.. 



Page One Hundred Twenty-one 



"PEN CLUB" 

HICKORY HI HICKORY, N. C. 



President FRANK HAMMOND .. — 1087621 

Public Enemy No. 1 



Vice-President HENRY REICHARD 1379421 

Public Enemy No. 3 



Secretary JEAN WILLIAMS - 16300011 

Public Enemy No. 13 



Treasurer MARY LEONARD . 1 00000 ! 

Public Enemy No. 50 



Dunce HENRY WILLIAMS 11313131 

Public Pest No. 1 



All five prisoners were up for 
six years but with the excep- 
tion of one they were released 
after four years on good 
behavior 



Page One Hundred Twenty-two 





AOHtlllEVIEMIENT IIN ANY UN IE 
OF IENDIEAVOIR. IIJTfltlE NATURAL 
IRJEJUILT OIE ABIILIITY AND 
lEXIPIEIPJIIENCIEJPILOJTOIPIPOIWrUNinni: 



TtttllJOIRiGANIIZAl 



OifcJ "If 



'MIT IPIKJIIDIE 



If jyCCIEJT-JOCCIEJX IEAJRNIEID 



BY TtttlE ABIILIIW Of II1IX MIEMIBIERJT, 
TttlE IEXIPIEIPJIIENCIE GAIINIED IIN 
TWENTY YIEAIRJT OIE lEfJEQIRX AND 



TIEIRJEID IBY 



entx 




OTAIWLOTTTIE IENGIRAVIING 
COMPANY II NC. 

AK.TI^T^-prtOTO-ENGRAVEFU -DEj'IGNEPJ , 

CH A PL LOT TE 

NO R.T ft 
CAFLOLI N A 

N ^TABLIJttED N IN ETEEN FIFTEEN '" 




( / 



*4i 



Organization 

Prepared to serve the 
most exacting annual staff. 
An organization with a thor- 
ough knowledge of printing and 
binding achieved through years 
of experience in the production of 
college and high school annuals . . . 



Observer Printing Hou* 

CHARLOTTE N.C. 

ESTABLISHED 1893